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I was using "exit 1" statement in my bash functions to terminate the whole script and it worked fine:

function func()
{
   echo "Goodbye"
   exit 1
}
echo "Function call will abort"
func
echo "This will never be printed"

But then I realized that it doesn't do the work when called like:

res=$(func)

I understand that I created a subshell and "exit 1" aborts that subshell and not the primary one....

But is there a way to write a function which aborts the whole execution, no matter how it is called? I just need to get the real return value (echoed by the function).

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up vote 36 down vote accepted

What you could do, is register the top level shell for the TERM signal to exit, and then send a TERM to the top level shell:

#!/bin/bash
trap "exit 1" TERM
export TOP_PID=$$

function func()
{
   echo "Goodbye"
   kill -s TERM $TOP_PID
}

echo "Function call will abort"
echo $(func)
echo "This will never be printed"

So, your function sends a TERM signal back to the top level shell, which is caught and handled using the provided command, in this case, "exit 1".

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1  
I was thinking of the C setsid() function, but it doesn't work quite the same way. Updated to not use the setsid command, as it would require us to start a new process. – FatalError Mar 27 '12 at 17:09
1  
Works. Any level of function nesting, any flow... Just works. – LiMar Mar 27 '12 at 18:04
    
Is it possible to make a general abort() function out of this that exits using the code of the first argument, e.g. abort 2 would do the trap "exit 2" TERM before kill ? – Neil C. Obremski Nov 22 '13 at 20:53
    
@NeilC.Obremski: Sure. It's mainly an issue of how to get the value to propagate back to the top level shell. Probably use a command like tempfile to select a place to store the code in the top shell, then have the shell that's exiting write the code to that file, then just read in the parent's handler. – FatalError Nov 25 '13 at 14:34
    
Seems to not work when there are intervening subshells. See alt solution for bash using set -E here – Ron Burk May 10 '15 at 5:18

You can use set -e:

set -e 
func
set +e

Or grab the return value:

(func) || exit $?
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1  
Interestingly I see a solution. "set -e" in the main script causes any function returning 1 (or exiting with it) to abort the whole execution. Unfortunately "set -e" changes drastically all the behavior and I cannot use it. – LiMar Mar 27 '12 at 16:49
    
You should use (( )) for numerical comparisons. Inside of [ ] -gt, -eq, etc should be used. – jordanm Mar 27 '12 at 17:04
7  
or even res=$(func) || exit – glenn jackman Mar 27 '12 at 17:14
    
@glennjackman gets the cookie, I think. that's much cleaner that the garbage I have! – brice Mar 27 '12 at 17:15

A child process can't force the parent process to close implicitly. You need to use some kind of signaling mechanism. Options might include a special return value, or perhaps sending some signal with kill, something like

function child() {
    local parent_pid="$1"
    local other="$2"
    ...
    if [[ $failed ]]; then
        kill -QUIT "$parent_pid"
    fi
}
share|improve this answer

But is there a way to write a function which aborts the whole execution, no matter how it is called?

No.

I just need to get the real return value (echoed by the function).

You can

res=$(func)
echo $?
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