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I have the following two queries, I believe that the one that uses the three index scans (second one) rather than a full one is more efficient but I need some more opinions. Also, how can I get one count from the three counts that are in the second query? How can I combine them into one? Thanks much

First Query

SELECT count(*) FROM bldng 
WHERE (bldng_type LIKE '%PTR%' OR bldng_type LIKE '%FACILITY-A%' 
OR bldng_type LIKE '%FACILITY-B%') AND area_sqf > 500

Second Query

SELECT count(*) FROM bldng WHERE bldng_type LIKE '%PTR%' AND area_sqf > 500 
UNION ALL
SELECT count(*) FROM bldng WHERE bldng_type LIKE '%FACILITY-A%' AND area_sqf > 500  
UNION ALL
SELECT count(*) FROM bldng WHERE bldng_type LIKE '%FACILITY-B%' AND area_sqf > 500

Ok this is the result I came up with after I ran both queries with 'set statistics io on'

First (single line) query:

Category    Timestamp   Duration    Message Line    Position
Connection  3/27/2012 2:36:49 PM        3615: Table 'bldng'. Scan count 1, logical  reads 33320, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.   1   0

Second query:

Category    Timestamp   Duration    Message Line    Position
Connection  3/27/2012 2:38:15 PM        3615: Table 'bldng'. Scan count 15, logical reads 76703, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.   1   0

Category    Timestamp   Duration    Message Line    Position
Connection  3/27/2012 2:38:15 PM        3615: Table 'Worktable'. Scan count 0, logical reads 0, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.    1   0

I'm not sure how to interpret these though. Do I compare the logical reads 33320 < 76703? So the first one has less does it mean it runs more efficiently?

Thanks

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2  
What DBMS are you using? Have you reviewed the execution plan of each query? – N West Mar 27 '12 at 17:07
1  
Also, these queries do two different things. Are you trying to get the count of records that match all of your criteria? – N West Mar 27 '12 at 17:09
    
Database is SQL Server 2005 – dido Mar 27 '12 at 17:10
    
Yes, sorry, corrected the mistake in the first one. Added the 'count' – dido Mar 27 '12 at 17:11
    
@dido They're still 2 different result sets. Do you also mean to add GROUP BY bldng_type to the first one? – Michael Berkowski Mar 27 '12 at 17:15
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Running one statement is usually more efficient than running three statements and then UNIONing the results together.

I'm assuming you are wanting the total count for all the filters you provided, (adding up the 3 rows of your second query to the total in the first query).

When you say "uses 3 indexes" - did you build 3 different indexes on the bldng_type column?

I would stick with the first statement since typically it will just perform a filter on the index on the bldng_type column using all 3 filters, a filter on the area_sqf column, and then a count on the results of the filter.

If you run the second, it may try to query the table 3 times and then join the results together.

But to really be sure, you need to view the query's execution plan to determine what it is doing.

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Well, when I run both statements it seems that the first one always executes slower than the second one (comparing the time it takes to run them). I'm not sure what you mean by execution plan? I'm just writing these for a new project. Nothing else has really been developed yet...Is the information on the time it takes to execute (from the editor I'm using) reliable? – dido Mar 27 '12 at 17:25

First off, none of the statements you wrote use any index on the bldng_type column. LIKE comparisons with the wildcard at the beginning of the string are non-optimizable.

In this case, I'd guess the first query is more efficient because it involves a single table scan rather than three separate ones. But see below.

Questions of "which query is more efficient" can only be answered by examining the query plan produced by the database engine. The plan will depend not only on the structure of the query but also on statistical information collected about the columns you're comparing against and since those statistics may change as you insert and update data in your database the most efficient query plan can change over time as well.

Finally, a "perfect" database engine would reduce all semantically identical queries to the same optimized query plan. That's not possible in the case you cited since the queries actually produce different results. But if you wrote the queries such that they were recognizably the same, they should (again, in a perfect database engine) run in the same amount of time.

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Not an SQL expert, but from what I remember, a single statement is usually better as it allows the optimizer to do its job better. Though short-circuit boolean logic isn't guaranteed, it is an option available to the optimizer in the first statement, whereas in the second option, you explicitly avoid it. Also, you might want to prioritize the OR comparisons by grouping them with parentheses...

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