Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
private double f(double x, double zn = 1)
    {
        double X = - zn;
        X *= x * x * (x + 1);
        X *= Math.Pow((x - 2), 0.333);
        return funct ? x : X;
    }

I have this code. When I try to find Math.Pow((x-2), 0.333) - i have NaN. How to solve it? Why NaN?

Sorry for my English =)

Rewrited...

private double f(double x, double zn = 1)
    {
        double answer = - zn;
        answer *= x * x * (x + 1);
        answer *= Math.Pow((x - 2), 0.333);
        return answer;
    }
share|improve this question
    
What parameter values did you use? (what are xand zn?) –  Hans Kesting Mar 27 '12 at 17:14
    
It's happening with all parameter values? –  ISun Mar 27 '12 at 17:15
    
@HansKesting zn is defaulted at 1, but an example of x would be nice. –  Khan Mar 27 '12 at 17:16
    
Perhaps x is less than 2.0. –  phoog Mar 27 '12 at 17:16
    
x is an argument of function. zn - positive or negative function returns –  LuckSound Mar 27 '12 at 17:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

My guess is that you're taking the cube root of a negative number. That seems the most likely cause, but your code is really hard to read due to having both x and X as local variables...

After closer examination, as you're not actually modifying x at any point, it really depends on the incoming value of x. If it's a finite value greater than or equal to 2, it should be fine. But if x is smaller than 2, it will fail (well, return NaN) for reasons of simple maths...

share|improve this answer
    
i try to rewrite this code. One moment, please –  LuckSound Mar 27 '12 at 17:16
    
hmm... How to write it, when number is less than 2? –  LuckSound Mar 27 '12 at 17:21
    
@lis.sanLee: That's impossible to say when we don't know the purpose of your code. –  Jon Skeet Mar 27 '12 at 17:25
1  
I find solve of this problem. I use Math.Abs(x-2), and then multiplied by the number sign. Thx for help –  LuckSound Mar 27 '12 at 17:31

You can see there all 3 cases when Math.Pow returns NaN:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.math.pow.aspx

public static double Pow(double x, double y)

1) x or y = NaN.

2) x < 0 but not NegativeInfinity; y is not an integer, NegativeInfinity, or PositiveInfinity.

3) x = -1; y = NegativeInfinity or PositiveInfinity.

share|improve this answer

Math.Pow is not defined for numbers less than 0 for given power. So you function will fail for some x.

x < 0 but not NegativeInfinity; y is not an integer, NegativeInfinity, or PositiveInfinity.
Result: NaN

share|improve this answer

If you look here it explains all the situations where Math.Pow will give NaN. I suspect this case may be your problem:

x < 0 but not NegativeInfinity; y is not an integer, NegativeInfinity, or PositiveInfinity.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.