Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say I have the class Foo. The following works fine:

class Foo
{
    public:
        const int* bar;

        Foo()
        {
            bar = new int[2] {1, 2};
        }
};

However, I tried to change this very slightly to use a template:

template<int A, int B>
class Foo
{
    public:
        const int* bar;

        Foo()
        {
            bar = new int[2] {A, B};
        }
};

My understanding of the way templates work is that A and B are essentially compile time constants, so it should still work the same.

The error message I get when compiling with g++ (4.5 in the link, same error with 4.6.3) is:

error: ISO C++ forbids initialization in array new [-fpermissive]

With 4.7 a similar error occurs, though slightly different:

error: parenthesized initializer in array new [-fpermissive]

The problem also occurs in template functions, and not just when template parameters are used within the braces for initialization, code and output. (thanks Philipp)

share|improve this question
1  
Are you compiling in C++11 mode? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 27 '12 at 17:18
2  
ideone.com/h7K7y Interesting. –  Mooing Duck Mar 27 '12 at 17:19
    
I was compiling with -std=c++0x in both cases. The result from Mooing Duck is exactly as i got (i mistake a look at ideone some time). –  Matt Mar 27 '12 at 17:27
    
Looks like a GCC bug. The standard allows it, and clang accepts it. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 27 '12 at 18:22
    
It's possible to provoke this with even simpler codes, e.g. gist.github.com/2220810 fails with g++-4.7 -std=c++11 -Wall -Wextra. –  Philipp Mar 27 '12 at 22:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Looks like this is a GCC bug. Clang accepts it, and the standard allows it:

new-initializer:

( expression-listopt)
braced-init-list

And the rules for this initialization are not special:

A new-expression that creates an object of type T initializes that object as follows:

— If the new-initializer is omitted, the object is default-initialized (8.5); if no initialization is performed, the object has indeterminate value.

— Otherwise, the new-initializer is interpreted according to the initialization rules of 8.5 for direct-initialization.

share|improve this answer
    
gcc-4.5.1 when compiled in C++0x mode (IDEOne) still has the error –  Mooing Duck Mar 27 '12 at 17:23
    
More likely it is a bug in GCC : ideone.com/h7K7y .. I compiled it with gcc-4.6.1 -std=c++0x, which gave same error message. –  Nawaz Mar 27 '12 at 17:24
1  
GCC 4.6.3 fixes that bug :) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 27 '12 at 17:24
    
g++ -v says that I am using gcc version 4.6.3 (Debian 4.6.3-1). Also, -std=c++11 is not recognised as a valid compiler option. I am in the process of testing 4.7. –  Matt Mar 27 '12 at 18:02
1  
@R.MartinhoFernandes, I have reported this as a bug here, linking back to this question. We'll see what the response is from that. –  Matt Mar 27 '12 at 18:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.