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is there a better way to solve this problem, preferably not through a module.

question is :

Text Processing. You are tired of seeing lines on your e-mail wrap because people type lines that are too long for your mail reader application. Create a program to scan a text file for all lines longer than 80 characters. For each of the offending lines, find the closest word before 80 characters and break the line there, inserting the remaining text to the next line (and pushing the previous next line down one). When you are done, there should be no lines longer than 80 characters.

let the content of 9-16.txt is:

Text Processing. You are tired of seeing lines on your e-mail wrap because people type lines that are too long for your mail reader application. Create a program to scan a text file for all lines longer than 80 characters. For each of the offending lines, find the closest word before 80 characters and break the line there, inserting the remaining text to the next line (and pushing the previous next line down one). When you are done, there should be no lines longer than 80 characters.

my program to achieve this

f=open('9-16.txt','r')

lis=[]
def ding(a):

    if len(a)<=80:
        lis.append(a)
        return
    else:
        if a[79]==' ':

            lis.append(a[:80])
            ding(a[80:])

        elif a[79]!=' ':
            ind=a.rfind(' ',0,79)

            lis.append(a[:ind+1])
            ding(a[ind+1:])

for x in f:
    if len(x)>80:
        ding(x)
    else:
        lis.append(x)

ty=open('9-16o.txt','w')
for x in lis:
    if x[-1]==' ':
        x=x[:-1]+'\n'
    else :
        x+='\n'    
    ty.write(x)
f.close()
ty.close()

9-16o.txt now contains:

Text Processing. You are tired of seeing lines on your e-mail wrap because
people type lines that are too long for your mail reader application. Create a
program to scan a text file for all lines longer than 80 characters. For each
of the offending lines, find the closest word before 80 characters and break
the line there, inserting the remaining text to the next line (and pushing the
previous next line down one). When you are done, there should be no lines
longer than 80 characters.
share|improve this question
1  
"preferably not through a module" Duplicating code or processes unnecessarily is a waste of time and energy. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 27 '12 at 18:02
    
This looks like homework. I've added the homework tag. –  Wilduck Mar 27 '12 at 18:03
    
ok! better way to solve this through modules? –  undefined is not a function Mar 27 '12 at 18:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here is a fairly simple and concise solution using regular expressions, it probably won't work for your homework but it should make it fairly obvious why restricting module use isn't advisable:

import re

s = 'Text Processing. You are tired of seeing lines on your e-mail wrap because people type lines that are too long for your mail reader application. Create a program to scan a text file for all lines longer than 80 characters. For each of the offending lines, find the closest word before 80 characters and break the line there, inserting the remaining text to the next line (and pushing the previous next line down one). When you are done, there should be no lines longer than 80 characters.'
print '\n'.join(line.strip() for line in re.findall(r'.{1,80}(?:\s+|$)', s))

Result:

Text Processing. You are tired of seeing lines on your e-mail wrap because
people type lines that are too long for your mail reader application. Create a
program to scan a text file for all lines longer than 80 characters. For each of
the offending lines, find the closest word before 80 characters and break the
line there, inserting the remaining text to the next line (and pushing the
previous next line down one). When you are done, there should be no lines longer
than 80 characters.

Your sample text is a single line, you would probably actually want to use something like this:

def split_lines(text):
    lines = text.split('\n')
    regex = re.compile(r'.{1,80}(?:\s+|$)')
    return '\n'.join(s.rstrip() for line in lines for s in regex.findall(line))
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks. Can you explain the refindall part? –  undefined is not a function Mar 27 '12 at 18:24
1  
Sure, the regex says "Find between 1 and 80 characters followed by one or more whitespace characters or the end of the string", so if you have a space at index 75 and a space at index 85, the regex would match 74 characters and then the space. re.findall() finds non-overlapping matches, so as soon as one match is completed it will pick up at the same index and find another 80ish characters followed by a space. –  Andrew Clark Mar 27 '12 at 18:28

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