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I have a rather simple question that I could normally debug myself, but I seem to be having quite the problem at this point in time.

I am creating a linked list data structure and I made two functions, one to return the front Elem and one to return the last Elem. The issue is that the compiler is saying that Elem does not define a type, when it does.

Here is the header file trimmed down the the relevant code:

class simpleList {

    public:
        //Returns a pointer to the first Elem of the list
        simpleList::Elem* front();

        //Returns a pointer to the last Elem of the list
        simpleList::Elem* back();

    private:
        struct Elem {
            char info;
            Elem *next;
        };

        Elem *head; 
};

and here is the .cpp file implementation of these two functions:

//Returns a pointer to the first Elem of the list
simpleList::Elem* simpleList::front()
{
    return head;
}

//Returns a pointer to the last Elem of the list
simpleList::Elem* simpleList::back()
{
    Elem * temp = head;

    while( temp -> next != 0 )
        temp = temp -> next;

    return temp;
}

I have tried both scoping them to the class and just doing:

Elem* simpleList::front()
Elem* simpleList::back()

The error message is as follows: simpleList.h:38:9: error: ‘Elem’ in ‘class simpleList’ does not name a type simpleList.h:41:9: error: ‘Elem’ in ‘class simpleList’ does not name a type

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2  
Move the struct to be before those functions. –  TBohne Mar 27 '12 at 18:16
2  
Don't retell compiler messages in your own words. Use copy and paste. Mark relevant line numbers in the code. –  n.m. Mar 27 '12 at 18:22
    
Moving it up worked wonders. It's always the simple stuff. –  Joshua Mar 27 '12 at 18:31
    
@Joshua: It's not just about moving it up to get it to work. See my answer as well. –  LiKao Mar 27 '12 at 18:57
    
Have you tried using std::list instead of rolling your own? –  Thomas Matthews Mar 27 '12 at 18:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this order for the class declaration:

class simpleList {
    public:

        struct Elem {
            char info;
            Elem *next;
        };

        //Returns a pointer to the first Elem of the list
        Elem* front();

        //Returns a pointer to the last Elem of the list
        Elem* back();

    private:
        Elem *head; 

};
share|improve this answer
    
Works great! Thanks! –  Joshua Mar 27 '12 at 18:39
    
Please, do not just correct other's code, but also let them know what was wrong. Just fixing stuff for others will not help them learn anything. See: kera.name/articles/2012/03/why-i-broke-up-with-stack-overflow –  LiKao Mar 27 '12 at 18:57

For the code you typed I get a lot more errors: http://ideone.com/c9PHc

Here are the details what is wrong, and why Bo's answer works.

  1. The ordering is wrong, so you have used the type Elem before you ever defined. You have to at least tell the compiler, that it exists and that it is a nested type for your class. Otherwise it will get to that point and not know what to do with it.

  2. Your struct Elem is private. I.e. this type can only be seen at private parts of the same class, just like a privat variable. You are returning this struct from a public method, so the return value is a public part, where this struct cannot be seen. Changing the ordering only but not makeing the type public at the same time, means you can call simpleList::front() and simpleList::back(), but not store the return type anywhere (since this would need a variable with a private type).

  3. You have duplicate scope specifiers in your return value declaration. This is not an error, but they are not really necessary and might confuse others. Usually at class level, you just use nested types directly without extra scoping specifiers.

So in this case it is not just the order which matters but the actual combination of errors. Count 1 cause the compiler error you are seeing, count 2 will cause your methods to be unusable and may cause compiler errors at other places and count 3 is merely aesthetics.

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