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I came across the following table structure and I need to perform a certain type of query upon it.

  • id
  • first_name
  • last_name
  • address
  • email
  • audit_parent_id
  • audit_entry_type
  • audit_change_date

The last three fields are for the audit trail. There is a convention that says: all original entries have the value "0" for "audit_parent_id" and the value "master" for "audit_entry_type". All the modified entries have the value of their parent id for audit_parent_id" and the value "modified" for the "audit_entry_type".

Now what I want to do is to be able to get the original value and the modified value for a field and I want to make this with less queries possible.

Any ideas? Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
The thing is I need to do some bug fixing in the application so I can't make any changes to the actual database. – Psyche Mar 27 '12 at 18:23
    
You mean, all of your tables has the last three fields? – Everton Agner Mar 27 '12 at 18:28
    
Almost all the tables, yes. – Psyche Mar 27 '12 at 18:29
    
The id property remains the same across all records regarding the same record? – Everton Agner Mar 27 '12 at 18:33
    
No, it increments with each entry. – Psyche Mar 27 '12 at 18:34

Assuming a simple case, when you want to get the latest adress value change for the record with id 50, this query fits your needs.

select
    p.id,
    p.adress as original_address,
    (select p1.adress from persons p1 where p1.audit_parent_id = p.id order by audit_change_date desc limit 1) as latest_address
from
    persons p -- Assuming it's the table name
where
    p.id = 50

But this assumes that, even if the address value doesn't change between one audit to the other, it remains the same in the field.

Here's another example, showing all persons that had an address change:

select
    p.id,
    p.adress as original_address,
    (select p1.adress from persons p1 where p1.audit_parent_id = p.id order by audit_change_date desc limit 1) as latest_address
from
    persons p -- Assuming it's the table name
where
    p.audit_parent_id = 0
    and
    p.adress not like (select p1.adress from persons p1 where p1.audit_parent_id = p.id order by audit_change_date desc limit 1)
share|improve this answer
    
No no, for the modified versions, the value in "audit_parent_id" will always be the id of the original version, not the id of a previous modification. – Psyche Mar 27 '12 at 18:46
    
Oh, that makes sense now. What do you need to track, exactly? – Everton Agner Mar 27 '12 at 18:48
1  
Pure SQL does have WITH RECURSIVE so you can do recursive queries (given a sufficiently recent PostgreSQL of course). – mu is too short Mar 27 '12 at 18:54
    
Whoa, I didn't know that. Well, I'm stuck with pg 1.8.3 for a while, so that explains it. – Everton Agner Mar 27 '12 at 18:55
1  
If you need more detailed queries, also give us more detailed information on what you need. – Everton Agner Mar 27 '12 at 19:24

As was @mu mentioned this could be solved with pure SQL in a more recent version using WITH RECURSIVE.

For PostgreSQL 8.3, this plpgsql function does the job while it is also a decent solution for modern PostgreSQL. You want to ..

get the original value and the modified value for a field

The demo picks first_name as filed:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION f_get_org_val(integer
  ,OUT first_name_curr text
  ,OUT first_name_org  text) AS
$BODY$
DECLARE
    _parent_id int;
BEGIN

SELECT INTO first_name_curr, first_name_org, _parent_id
            first_name,      first_name,     audit_parent_id
FROM   tbl
WHERE  id = $1;

WHILE _parent_id <> 0
LOOP
    SELECT INTO first_name_org, _parent_id
                first_name,     audit_parent_id
    FROM   tbl
    WHERE  id = _parent_id;
END LOOP;

END;
$BODY$  LANGUAGE plpgsql;

COMMENT ON FUNCTION f_get_org_val(int) IS 'Get current and original values of xyz.
 $1 .. id';

Call:

SELECT * FROM f_get_org_val(123);

This assumes that all trees have a root node with parent_id = 0. No circular references, or you will end up with an endless loop. You might want to add a counter and exit the loop after x iterations.

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