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I'm attempting to remove a character from a string in C. The problem I am having with my code is that it removes the first instance of the character from the string but also wipes everything after that character in the string too. For example, removing 'l' from 'hello' prints 'he' rather than 'heo'

int i;
char str1[30] = "Hello", *ptr1, c = 'l';
ptr1 = str1;
for (i=0; i<strlen(str1); i++)
{
    if (*ptr1 == c) *ptr1 = 0;
    printf("%c\n", *ptr1);
    ptr1++;
}

I need to use pointers for this and would like to keep it as simple as possible since I'm a beginner in C. Thanks

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1  
Hint: during removal, you want to shift the other letters up to cover the ones you remove. *ptr1 = 0; is not the way to do that. –  Mooing Duck Mar 27 '12 at 18:18
    
You are also using a for/loop to address the index of each char, but you are never using the actual index (Value of i) –  Craig Trombly Mar 27 '12 at 18:20
    
Another thing to remember, in CS, strings are null terminated. –  Craig Trombly Mar 27 '12 at 18:21
    
@CraigTrombly CS? –  AoeAoe Mar 27 '12 at 18:38
    
Meant to say in C, is strings.... Dyslexic typer..... –  Craig Trombly Mar 27 '12 at 19:27

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can do it like this:

void remove_all_chars(char* str, char c) {
    char *pr = str, *pw = str;
    while (*pr) {
        *pw = *pr++;
        pw += (*pw != c);
    }
    *pw = '\0';
}

int main() {
    char str[] = "llHello, world!ll";
    remove_all_chars(str, 'l');
    printf("'%s'\n", str);
    return 0;
}

The idea is to keep a separate read and write pointers (pr for reading and pw for writing), always advance the reading pointer, and advance the writing pointer only when it's not pointing to a given character.

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Thank you for the simple answer and description, that solved it. Also thanks for everyone else's input. –  Dice719 Mar 27 '12 at 18:42

If you remove the characters in place you will have to shift the rest of the string one place to the left every time you remove a character, this is not very efficient. The best way is to have a second array that takes the filtered string. For example you can change your code like this.

int i;
char str1[30] = "Hello", *ptr1, c = 'l';
char str2[30] = {0}, *ptr2;
ptr1 = str1;
ptr2 = str2;
for (i=0; i<strlen(str1); i++)
{
    if (*ptr1 != c) *ptr2++=*ptr1;
    ptr1++;
}
printf("%s\n", str2);
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Except that you should really not call strlen() in the condition of a loop like that, this is a good answer. Granted, that's a mistake inherited from the code in the question, but ... –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 22 at 1:59
char str1[30] = "Hello", *prt1, c = 'l';
char str2[30], *prt2;
prt1 = str1;
prt2 = str2;
while(*prt1 != 0)
{
    if(*prt1 != c)
    {
         *prt2 = *prt1;
         prt2++;  
    }
    prt1++;
}
*prt2 = '\0';
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The problem is that when you encounter the first character that matches c, you insert a null character right there. That means you're essentially cutting off the rest of the string.

What you need to do is when you find a matching character, move the following characters back one position. Then you need to insert the null character at the very end depending on how many characters you have removed.

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C defines a string as "a contiguous sequence of characters terminated by and including the first null character"

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True, but hardly an explanatory answer to the question. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 22 at 2:00

just change

if (*ptr1 == c) *ptr1 = 0;

to

if (*ptr1 == c) continue;

as @ouah said, it breaks at the first NULL character..

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That is not a sufficient fix. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 22 at 2:02

i know that it is a type of duplicate answer, but this code is function's version for solving the problem. I thought that as the questioner was a beginner, he might learn much from decomposed version of problem.

int del_x_char(char *p, int x)
{
    char *q;
    x=first_occurance(p, 'i')/*you can replace any character that you want delete with 'i'*/
    q=p+x;
    while(*q=*(q+1))
        q++;
    *q='\0';
    return 0;
}
int first_occurance(char *q, char phar)
{
    int i=0;
    while(*q)
    {   
        if(*q++==phar)
            return i;
        i++;
    }
    return -1;
}
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