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Hello I'm stuck on a simple Java exercise, I hope someone can help.

Sorry if this is really simple I'm a java newbie.

What I'm having trouble with: if the user enters a string other than "help" such as "foo" then I get the following error:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NumberFormatException: For input string: "foo"

at java.lang.NumberFormatException.forInputString(NumberFormatException.java:48)

at java.lang.Integer.parseInt(Integer.java:447)

at java.lang.Integer.parseInt(Integer.java:497)

at NumberGuess.main(NumberGuess.java:10)

What I think is happening: "foo" is not being caught by "else" because args[0] is an object reference and not really a string.

What I want to know: How to catch everything other than "help" or the numbers "1" to "5"?

Here is the code...

public class NumberGuess {

public static void main(String args[]){

	int r;
	int g;

	if ((args[0].compareTo("help")) == 0){
		System.out.println("Enter a number between 1-5 to play.");
	} else if (Integer.parseInt(args[0]) > 0 && Integer.parseInt(args[0]) <= 5){

		r = ((int)(Math.random()));
		g = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);

		if (r == g){
			System.out.println("YOU WON!");
		} else {
			System.out.println("Wrong: number was " + r);
		}

	} else {
		System.out.println("Something went horribly wrong.");

	}}}
share|improve this question
    
Just FYI, for more complex argument parsing, I'd suggest commons-cli. –  KitsuneYMG Sep 9 '09 at 19:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The program logic is essentially, "if argument zero is not 'help', parse it as an integer…" At that point, the exception is thrown, because "foo" is not a valid integer.

The simplest approach is to catch the NumberFormatException and print a more helpful message.

if ("help".equals(args[0])) {
  System.out.println("Enter a number between 1 and 5 to play.");
}
else {
  int number;
  try {
    number = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
  }
  catch (NumberFormatException ex) {
    System.out.println("Input is not an integer: " + args[0]);
    return;
  }
  if ((number < 1) || (number > 5)) {
    System.out.println("Number out of bounds: " + number);
    return;
  }
  int r = new java.util.Random().nextInt(5) + 1;
  if (number == r)
    System.out.println("You won!");
  else
    System.out.println("You lost!");
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you :) and thanks everyone for the quick answers really quite amazing –  Alex Combas Jun 13 '09 at 0:23

What is happening here is that the code goes in the else block (as you guessed) and the else block straight away tries to convert the parameter into a number (Integer.parseInt(args[0]). So, you can add a try catch block for handling such scenarios:

public class NumberGuess {

public static void main(String args[]){

    int r;
    int g;
	int temp;

    if ((args[0].compareTo("help")) == 0){
            System.out.println("Enter a number between 1-5 to play.");
    } else {
			try{
				temp = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
			}catch(NumberFormatException e){
				System.out.println("Please enter a number");
				System.exit(-1);
			}
            if (Integer.parseInt(args[0]) > 0 && Integer.parseInt(args[0]) <= 5){
			r = ((int)(Math.random()));
            g = Integer.parseInt(temp);

            if (r == g){
                    System.out.println("YOU WON!");
            } else {
                    System.out.println("Wrong: number was " + r);
            }
			}

    } else {
            System.out.println("Something went horribly wrong.");

    }}}

Here's is one way you could write the code (just a suggestion).

share|improve this answer

The first thing it does after looking for "Help" is trying to parse it as a number:

g = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);

What you can try to do is catch this exception by changing that line to:

try {
    g = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
} catch(NumberFormatException e) {
    System.out.println("The first parameter was supposed to be a number!");
    System.exit(1);
}

If you meant to accept parameters like "foo 1", then you should be parsing args[1] as the number, and args[0] you should test to see if it's "foo" like this:

if(args[0].equalsIgnoreCase("foo")) {
    // now we know foo is the first arg.  Parse args[1]!
    ...
}

Oh, by the way. "Random" numbers in most languages are a number between 0 and 1. They generally look like ".108937190823..."

If you want to check for a number like 1-10, you need to do something like this:

Random().nextInt(10) + 1;  // (Thanks @mmyers)

(Not totally sure that's the right way to do it, but it's close.

share|improve this answer
    
The right way to do it is to create a java.util.Random object and call nextInt(10) on it. That gives an int in the range [0,9], which you can then add 1 to. –  Michael Myers Jun 13 '09 at 0:19
    
@mmyers thanks! Haven't messed with Random much on java--good to know. –  Bill K Jun 15 '09 at 15:52
    
See java.sun.com/docs/books/effective/excursion-random.html for an explanation of the algorithm used in nextInt(int). It's really quite involved. –  Michael Myers Jun 15 '09 at 16:00

As you've noticed, parseInt raises an exception if you try to parse a string that doesn't correctly represent an error; try/catch is the Java construct for catching such exceptions and dealing with them -- look it up in your favorite Java docs!

share|improve this answer
1  
It's try/catch in Java, actually. –  Michael Myers Jun 13 '09 at 0:07
    
Oops, thanks @mmyers, editing answer to correct this! –  Alex Martelli Jun 13 '09 at 2:21

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