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Im trying to write a program that takes new york city x/y coords and turns them into lat/lng decimal points. Im new to planar/globe mapping. Ive included the constants that NYC has provided on their website. Also if there is a good article on how to do this I would love to learn! Below is the program I have written along with commented output at the bottom and also what the ideal values should be. Im kinda just stumbling in the dark on this.

#!/usr/bin/python
from math import *

"""
Supplied by NYC
Lambert Conformal Conic:

    Standard Parallel: 40.666667
    Standard Parallel: 41.033333
    Longitude of Central Meridian: -74.000000
    Latitude of Projection Origin: 40.166667
    False Easting: 984250.000000
    False Northing: 0.000000

"""

x = 981106                      #nyc x coord
y = 195544                      #nyc y coord
a = 6378137                     #' major radius of ellipsoid, map units (NAD 83)
e = 0.08181922146               #' eccentricity of ellipsoid (NAD 83)
angRad = pi/180                 #' number of radians in a degree
pi4 = pi/4                      #' Pi / 4

p0 = 40.166667 * angRad        #' latitude of origin
p1 = 40.666667 * angRad        #' latitude of first standard parallel
p2 = 41.033333 * angRad        #' latitude of second standard parallel
m0 = -74.000000 * angRad       #' central meridian
x0 = 984250.000000             #' False easting of central meridian, map units

m1 = cos(p1) / sqrt(1 - ((e ** 2) * sin(p1) ** 2))
m2 = cos(p2) / sqrt(1 - ((e ** 2) * sin(p2) ** 2))
t0 = tan(pi4 - (p0 / 2))
t1 = tan(pi4 - (p1 / 2))
t2 = tan(pi4 - (p2 / 2))
t0 = t0 / (((1 - (e * (sin(p0)))) / (1 + (e * (sin(p0)))))**(e / 2))
t1 = t1 / (((1 - (e * (sin(p1)))) / (1 + (e * (sin(p1)))))**(e / 2))
t2 = t2 / (((1 - (e * (sin(p2)))) / (1 + (e * (sin(p2)))))**(e / 2))
n = log(m1 / m2) / log(t1 / t2)
f = m1 / (n * (t1 ** n))
rho0 = a * f * (t0 ** n)

x = x - x0
pi2 = pi4 * 2
rho = sqrt((x ** 2) + ((rho0 - y) ** 2))
theta = atan(x / (rho0 - y))
t = (rho / (a * f)) ** (1 / n)
lon = (theta / n) + m0
x = x + x0

lat0 = pi2 - (2 * atan(t))

part1 = (1 - (e * sin(lat0))) / (1 + (e * sin(lat0)))
lat1 = pi2 - (2 * atan(t * (part1 ** (e / 2))))
while abs(lat1 - lat0) < 0.000000002:
    lat0 = lat1
    part1 = (1 - (e * sin(lat0))) / (1 + (e * sin(lat0)))
    lat1 = pi2 - (2 * atan(t * (part1 ^ (e / 2))))

lat = lat1 / angRad
lon = lon / angRad

print lat,lon
#output : 41.9266666432 -74.0378981653
#should be 40.703778, -74.011829

Im pretty stuck, I have a ton of these that need geo-coded Thanks for any help!

share|improve this question
    
Maybe en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Map_projection could get you started? –  Jouni K. Seppänen Mar 27 '12 at 19:14
    
More details about the projection used: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lambert_conformal_conic_projection –  arboc7 Mar 27 '12 at 20:50
1  
Just read that article and started implementing the formula then I realized that I am doing an ellipsoidal transformation and that formula isn't there all it says is: Formulæ for ellipsoidal datums are more involved. –  busbina Mar 27 '12 at 20:59
2  
Your code states that this is a conic projection, not ellipsoidal... –  arboc7 Mar 27 '12 at 21:01
    
hmm good catch, didnt even see that, thats probably why im just a hair off. Im calculating for the eccentricity of ellipsoid when the data is conic. –  busbina Mar 27 '12 at 21:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

One word answer: pyproj

>>> from pyproj import Proj
>>> pnyc = Proj(
...     proj='lcc',
...     datum='NAD83',
...     lat_1=40.666667,
...     lat_2=41.033333,
...     lat_0=40.166667,
...     lon_0=-74.0,
...     x_0=984250.0,
...     y_0=0.0)
>>> x = [981106.0]
>>> y = [195544.0]
>>> lon, lat = pnyc(x, y, inverse=True)
>>> lon, lat
([-74.037898165369015], [41.927378144152335])
share|improve this answer
    
This looks awesome! but still not the accuracy that I need, is that just a limitation of the data being in x,y? Actually that just outputs the results I already have :S –  busbina Mar 27 '12 at 22:21
    
Are you certain your expected values are correct? –  sgillies Mar 27 '12 at 22:51
    
also after playing around with this shouldn't the longitude -74 –  busbina Mar 27 '12 at 22:52
    
I geocoded using Google from the address I have. This should end up somewhere in lower Manhattan. Here is a link to the map description nyc.gov/html/dcp/html/bytes/… –  busbina Mar 27 '12 at 22:55
    
never mind, the address is 99 BROAD STREET in Manhattan, even with the -74 change im still landing in upstate kinda by Poughkeepsie. Unless this data that I got from nyc is bad. –  busbina Mar 27 '12 at 23:12

owww. you'd be better using a library for this. a little searching suggests that should be the python interface to gdal

this question uses gdal, but not via the python api (they just call gdal via a command line from within python), but might help.

you might be best asking at gis stackexchange for more info.

i'm unclear where you got the code above from. if you link to it i/someone could check for obvious implementation errors.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey thanks everyone! I hacked up some code I found at the Montana State GIS repo. It was written in asp/vb heres the link. Its pretty much identical to my code. I am going to check out this library though. nris.mt.gov/gis/projection/stategeo_asp.txt Also I do have the addresses for these buildings which is how I got the correct geocode. I just have waaaaaaaaaaaay to many of these to use a geocoding service. –  busbina Mar 27 '12 at 21:02
    
can't find any errors, sorry. –  andrew cooke Mar 27 '12 at 21:15
    
@arboc7 caught the fact that my data is conical but this program is for an ellipsoid. Which I think is why I am getting close answers but not correct answers. –  busbina Mar 27 '12 at 21:26
    
yeah, saw that. sounds right - good luck. –  andrew cooke Mar 27 '12 at 21:46

Rather than trying to work through all the math, you could just pick a grid over your map surface and find out the lat/long of those grid points, then use interpolation to do the conversion. Depending on the linearity of the projection it might not take many points to get good accuracy.

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