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I wanted to make a lazy list in Scheme. This is what I have so far.

;; Constructor for Pairs
(define (cons-stream a b)
  (cons a (λ() b)))

;; Selectors
(define (car-stream a-stream)
  (car a-stream))

(define (cdr-stream a-stream)
  ((cdr a-stream)))

;; Lazy List using the pairs
(define (lazy-list from)
  (cons-stream from (lazy-list (+ from 1))))

;; Take function
(define (take a-lazy-list number)
  (define (take-helper i )
    (if(= i number)
       empty
       (cons (car a-lazy-list) (take-helper (+ i 1)))))
  (take-helper 0))

The problem with the lazy-list is that Scheme evaluates the inner expression (lazy-list (+ from 1)) first causing the procedure to go into an infinite recursion.

Is there a way to make the con-stream take this inner expression without any evaluation?

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1  
Darn, now I want to learn Scheme, too :-D –  Tor Haugen Jun 13 '09 at 0:40
1  
Its not scheme, but this page has an implementation of a lazy list in F#: en.wikibooks.org/wiki/F_Sharp_Programming/Caching#Lazy_Values –  Juliet Jun 13 '09 at 0:40
    
Is this a homework question? –  kanak Jun 13 '09 at 2:28
    
Y e s. –  unj2 Jun 13 '09 at 2:29
    
I didn't see the homework tag. Is this an academic exercise, learning exercise, or for use in a larger project? What's wrong with SRFI-40 or SRFI-41? –  Aaron Jun 18 '09 at 6:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The solution is to use a macro. I'm no scheme expert (especially not on macros), but maybe this snippet can serve as inspiration:

(define-syntax pointer-to
   (syntax-rules ()
    ((pointer-to var)
     (make-pointer
      (lambda () var) ; the "pointer dereference" operation
      (lambda (value) (set! var value)))))) ; "pointer write"

It's used as follows:

(define x 1)
(define px (pointer-to x))
(pointer-set! px 2) ; this (in some sense) becomes `(set! x 2)'

So maybe you want something like

(define-syntax lazy-cons
 (syntax-rules ()
  ((lazy-cons head lazytail)
   (cons head (lambda () lazytail)))))

But I'm not sure. Have a look at define-syntax.

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Wow. That worked. But could you comment on your code. I dont know how and when to use a macro. –  unj2 Jun 13 '09 at 4:51
1  
I'll try, to the best of my ability. "(define-syntax NAME (syntax-rules () ((NAME ARG1 ARG2 ...) SOME_EXPRESSION))))" means: whenever the parser sees (NAME ARG1 ARG2 ...) it replaces it with SOME_EXPRESSION, doing argument substitution in SOME_EXPRESSION. In the case of lazy-cons, it rewrites (lazy-cons 1 (list 1 2)) to (cons 1 (lambda () (list 1 2))). Note that head took the "value" 1 (really, the syntax tree 1) and was inserted into the cons; and lazytail had the "value" (list 1 2) and was... "inserted into" the call to cons. It's somewhat similar to macros in C and C++, except better :) –  Jonas Kölker Jun 14 '09 at 11:09

If you don't want to go the macro route, you could always just abandon cons-stream and rewrite lazy-list as follows:

(define (lazy-list from)
  (cons from (λ() (lazy-list (+ from 1)))))

This is probably the easiest, most pragmatic solution, but it's only good for making lazy lists of incrementing numbers. You could generalize this by passing in a function that will generate successive elements of the list when called:

(define (lazy-list-gen generator)
  (cons (generator)
        (λ() (lazy-list-gen generator))))

(define (lazy-list from)
  (lazy-list-gen
   (λ()
     (let ((ret from))
       (set! from (+ from 1))
       ret))))

This works pretty well:

> (define x (lazy-list 1))
> (car-stream x)
1
> (car-stream (cdr-stream x))
2

But there's a bug in the code:

... continuing from above ...
> (car-stream (cdr-stream x))
3

This error happens because the call to cdr-stream calls generator again. We can solve this by caching the return value of the lambda:

(define (lazy-list-gen generator)
  (cons (generator)
        (let ((gen-cache #f))
          (λ()
            (cond ((not gen-cache)
                   (set! gen-cache (lazy-list-gen generator))))
            gen-cache))))

Now it works as it should:

> (define x (lazy-list 1))
> (car-stream x)
1
> (car-stream (cdr-stream x))
2
> (car-stream (cdr-stream x))
2
> (car-stream (cdr-stream (cdr-stream x)))
3
> (car-stream (cdr-stream x))
2
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A lazy list in Scheme is known as a stream. Here's the standard introduction.

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Yes. If you look at my program, I am trying to make a stream. –  unj2 Jun 13 '09 at 13:14
    
You should be aware that SICP streams aren't fully lazy (the head of the stream is strict) which can cause problems in some situations. SRFI-41, mentioned in another answer, provides fully lazy streams in all situations. –  user448810 Jul 13 '12 at 12:52

You should really look at SRFI-41

In particular, lazy streams created by recursive functions will leak memory badly in an eager language, unless you specifically avoid it. To do so, you need to make recursive functions lazy also, not eager. This means that your laziness implementation needs to be SRFI-45, which exports delay, force, and lazy. Functions that build streams recursively must wrap their bodies in lazy.

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