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This is my code. I can not understand what is the problem, but Visual Studio 2008 says that

Operator (*) Cannot be applied to operands of type 'object' and 'double'

Thanks ...

#region Using directives

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;

#endregion

namespace DailyRate
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            (new Program()).run();
        }

        public void run()
        {
            double dailyRate = readDouble("Enter your daily rate: ");
            int noOfDays = readInt("Enter the number of days: ");
            writeFree(CalculateFee(dailyRate, noOfDays));
        }

        private void writeFree(object p)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", p * 1.1);
        }

        private double CalculateFee(double dailyRate, int noOfDays)
        {
            return dailyRate * noOfDays;
        }

        private int readInt(string p)
        {
            Console.Write(p);
            string line = Console.ReadLine();
            return int.Parse(line);
        }

        private double readDouble(string p)
        {
            Console.Write(p);
            string line = Console.ReadLine();
            return double.Parse(line);
        }
    }
}
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16 Answers 16

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Sixteen answers so far and fifteen of them tell you to do something wrong.

First off, as everyone has told you, you cannot multiply an object by a double. But the solution is not to multiply a double by a double! You are doing a financial calculation; never use doubles for financial calculations. Doubles are for physics problems, not money problems.

The right thing to do is to stop using doubles in the first place. You should be using decimal, not double.

(And while you are fixing this problem: the standard in C# is to CapitalizeYourMethodsLikeThis, notLikeThis.)

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This is oh-so-important a bit of information. Eric's answers generally don't need extra weight behind them, but I've seen this too often; floating-point numbers used to represent money values. Bad! –  Andrew Barber Mar 28 '12 at 17:28
2  
@AndrewBarber: Actually the problem is not so much using floating point to represent money, as using binary floating point rather than decimal floating point. After all, you are not likely to be dealing with sums of money so large that the floating nature of the point will matter. The problem is that binary floating point cannot exactly represent values that are likely to come up when dealing with money (and these are values our base-10 intuition tells us are exact). Also the rules for rounding are unlikely to do what you want for monetary values. –  Kevin Cathcart May 3 '12 at 15:52

It is your writeFee method that fails to compile. You can't multiply an object with a number, the compiler doesn't know how - an object can be anything and might not be a number.

In this case the solution is simple, just declare the writeFee parameter as double:

 private void writeFree(double p)
 {
     Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", p * 1.1);
 }
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in your code

private void writeFree(object p)
{
     Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", p * 1.1);
}

P is an object and the compiler doesn't know how to multiply an object and a double.

private void writeFree(double p)
{
     Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", p * 1.1);
}

Will work as long as you call the function with doubles.

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There is no * operator for object. Your method takes an object for some unknown reason. Looks to me like it should take a numerical value. So either:

A) Change the writeFree method to take an appropriate numerical type, or B) Cast the object to an appropriate numerical type before multiplying.

Of course, given the example you have shown us, option B is really just a poor man's version of option A.

...

So go with option A.

Consider this:

writeFree("Uh oh!");

What would you expect the result of "Uh oh!" * 1.1 to be? It would be legal if your code compiled.

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Use

  Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", (double) p * 1.1);
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Your problem lies in this method:

private void writeFree(object p)
{
    Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", p * 1.1);
}

Would need to modify the signature of the method so it knows p is a double, or cast the p as a double:

private void writeFree(double p)
{
    Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", p * 1.1);
}

or

private void writeFree(object p)
{
    Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", (double)p * 1.1);
}
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You have to cast p as a numeric type if you want to use it in a math operation.

Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", ((double)p) * 1.1);

Since it looks like you are expecting to pass a double to writeFree, it would make more sense to declare an appropriate type for p there.

private void writeFree(double p)

That would eliminate the need for the cast operation.

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You need to either cast p as a double

Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", (double)p * 1.1);

Or change your writeFree to accept a double and it will work and it also makes sense to do this since your CalculateFee is already returning a double.

    private void writeFree(double p)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", p * 1.1);
    }
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Try

Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", Double.Parse(p) * 1.1);
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Write like this:

Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", ((double)p * 1.1));

p on this line is a object and not a doulbe. Can not multiply object with double.

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Change:

    private void writeFree(object p)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", p * 1.1);
    }

To:

    private void writeFree(double p)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", p * 1.1);
    }

As you currently have it written, the compiler thinks you're trying to multiply an object by 1.1, which it doesn't know how to do.

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On the line:

Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", p * 1.1);

You should cast p (which is an object) to a double or another numeric type.

Hope that helps.

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Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", p * 1.1);

p is an object (see method signature). If you know what type is then you can simply cast

Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", (double)p * 1.1);

I have done double there but you may use float, int etc. If you don't know what the type is then you would need to do some simply type testing using 'as' or 'is'/ typeof etc.

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The problem is that you can't multiply an object by a double. From the code usage, you should change

private void writeFree(object p)
{
   Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", p * 1.1);
}

to

private void writeFree(double p)
{
  Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", p * 1.1);
}
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You mustn't say that you multiply an object by a numeric value.
All you have to do is to guarantee that the parameter is a numeric value so you have to change your function parameter type to a numeric type.
Do not use (double) cast inside your function because it can lead to strange behavior if you pass a non-numeric argument to the function. Clean code says always use the most specific type you need as a function parameter to avoid mistakes. In your case it can be double.

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Your problem is in the WriteFree method:

    private void writeFree(object p)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("The consultant's fee is: {0}", p * 1.1);
    }

You cannot multiply object * 1.1

Change it to WriteFree(double p)

Or Try parsing P as a double if you have to take an object argument.

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