Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a main thread that is a form, that starts another application, in this case Notepad, then I spawn off a BackgroundWorker that waits for Notepad to be closed. When its closed, the BackgroundWorker shows another Form to display, topmost, to the user. This Form needs to be non-modal, so that the user can click on some buttons on the main thread dialog. The problem is this form (Form2, from the BackgroundWorker) is NOT TopMost, even though I set it to true. It works when I hit F5, but when I publish, as a ClickOnce application, to my server, form2 is no longer TopMost. I have tired Form2.Topmost = true, BringToFront, Activate, "MakeTopMost" from what is powerfull way to force a form to bring front? .... nothing seems to work.

I even tried to get the handle of the main form, and use that as the parent of form2, but I'm getting "InvalidOperationException: Cross-thread operation not valid: Control 'Form2' accessed from a thread other than the thread it was created on."

Here is a code snippet:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    System.Diagnostics.Process p = new System.Diagnostics.Process();
    private BackgroundWorker endApplicationBackgroundWorker= new BackgroundWorker();

    public Form1(string[] args)
    {
        endApplicationBackgroundWorker.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(endApplicationBackgroundWorker_DoWork);

        p.StartInfo.FileName = "notepad";
        p.Start();

        endApplicationBackgroundWorker.RunWorkerAsync();

        //Quit here so we can accept user inputs (button pushes ..)
    }

    private void endApplicationBackgroundWorker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        p.WaitForExit();

        Form2 form2 = new Form2();
        form2.TopMost = true;

        System.Diagnostics.Process[] procs = System.Diagnostics.Process.GetProcessesByName(form1ProcessName);
        if (procs.Length != 0)
        {
            IntPtr hwnd = procs[0].MainWindowHandle;
            if (form2.ShowDialog(new WindowWrapper(hwnd)) == DialogResult.OK)
            {
                // process stuff
            }
        }

        this.Close();
    }
}

Any other ideas? Or can someone fix my code above? I have been dealing with this issue for weeks now and getting flustered.

Thanks!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Any work you do in a BackgroundWorker's DoWork method after calling the RunWorkerAsync procedure is NOT running on the UI thread, but your code is creating a form in the background.

Forms are UI elements, so this won't work:

private void endApplicationBackgroundWorker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
  Form2 form2 = new Form2();
  form2.TopMost = true;
  // etc..
  if (form2.ShowDialog(new WindowWrapper(hwnd)) == DialogResult.OK)
  {
    // process stuff
  }
}

From the comments, you should subscribe to the RunWorkerCompleted event to show your second form. Also, you can't call the Close method either since you are trying to keep Form2 alive without a ShowDialog call, so try subscribing to the Form_Closing() event of the second form to notify when the main form should be closed, too:

public Form1(string[] args)
{
  endApplicationBackgroundWorker.DoWork += 
    new DoWorkEventHandler(endApplicationBackgroundWorker_DoWork);
  endApplicationBackgroundWorker.RunWorkerCompleted += 
    new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(endApplicationBackgroundWorker_RunWorkerCompleted);

  p.StartInfo.FileName = "notepad";
  endApplicationBackgroundWorker.RunWorkerAsync();
}

private void endApplicationBackgroundWorker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
  p.Start();
  p.WaitForExit();
}

private void endApplicationBackgroundWorker_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
{
  Form2 form2 = new Form2();
  form2.TopMost = true;
  form2.FormClosing += new FormClosingEventHandler(form2_FormClosing);    
  form2.Show(this);
}

private void form2_FormClosing(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e)
{
  this.BeginInvoke(new MethodInvoker(delegate { this.Close(); }));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Apologies, you are correct. In my cutting out of non important code I put code in the wrong place. The WaitForExit is in the BackgroundWorker (I updated the code above). This is so the Background worker can wait, while the main thread can accept button clicks. I want the user to be able to click the same buttons on the main form while form2 is open. –  Tizz Mar 27 '12 at 22:35
    
@Tizz It seems like all you need in your DoWork method is p.Start and p.WaitForExit and then subscribe to the RunWorkerCompleted event and move all of your Form2 stuff there. It seems like at that point, nothing is happening in a background thread and is demanding the user's attention on the UI thread. –  LarsTech Mar 27 '12 at 23:38
    
Isnt RunWorkerCompleted on the same BackgroundWorker thread? Wont I get the same results? –  Tizz Mar 29 '12 at 1:04
    
@Tizz No, it fires on the main thread just like the ProgressChanged event does to update the progress bar. –  LarsTech Mar 29 '12 at 1:07
    
Cool, ok, I see it working. So the idea of this was to have this dialog pop up (Form2) and the user would still be able to click on Form1 ... this wont allow that to happen. –  Tizz Mar 29 '12 at 2:21

Another workaround can be, if you set the topmost to false and then set it back to true. It is strange, but it works. So the code could be the following for a form to be show with descending oppacity in a simple background thread:

for (int i = 0; i < 50; i++)
{
     ppaForm.SetBitmap(bitmap, (byte)(255 - i * 5));
     ppaForm.Show();
     ppaForm.TopMost = false;
     ppaForm.TopMost = true;

     Thread.Sleep(6);
}

In this case ppaForm is a PerPixelAlphaForm, for which you can find a description here.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.