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Please see my code:

IDictionary dictionary = new Hashtable();
const string key = "key";
const string value = "value";
dictionary[key] = null; // set some trigger here

// set value
IDictionaryEnumerator dictionaryEnumerator = dictionary.GetEnumerator();
while (dictionaryEnumerator.MoveNext())
{
    DictionaryEntry entry = dictionaryEnumerator.Entry;
    if (entry.Value == null) // some business logic check; check for null value here
    {
        entry.Value = value; // set new value here
        break;
    }
}

Assert.AreEqual(value, dictionary[key]); // I have Fail here!

I wonder :

  1. What is correct approach for set new value for IDictionary when I do not know the corresponding key.

  2. Why my example is not working? As I understand I have set new value for DictionaryEntry by value (and value here is a reference) but it was not affected in source IDictionary. Why?

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is there a reason you are not using a generic dictionary? Dictionary<string,string> –  Simon Mar 28 '12 at 6:10
    
yes, I can not use generics –  Michael Z Mar 28 '12 at 10:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

DictionaryEntry does not hold a direct reference to the actual values, the internal datastructure is quite different. Therefore, setting the value on a DictionaryEntry will do nothing to the values actually in the Hashtable.

To set a value, you must use the indexer. You can enumerate on the keys rather on the key-value pairs. This code is equivalent of what you tried with DictionaryEntry:

IDictionary dictionary = new Hashtable();
const string key = "key";
const string value = "value";
dictionary[key] = null; // set some trigger here

foreach(var k in dictionary.Keys.OfType<object>().ToArray()) 
{
    if(dictionary[k] == null) 
        dictionary[k] = value;
}
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It makes more sense to use Cast<object> instead of OfType<object>. Also, it's worth mentioning that DictionaryEntry is a struct. (It's an evil mutable struct, to boot!) When you enumerate the Hashtable, you get a sequence of these structs that tell you what's in the Hashtable, but cannot be used to modify the Hashtable. This would have been more apparent if the struct had been made immutable, as with its successor KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>. –  phoog Mar 27 '12 at 20:58

Suggestions

  • Move to a Dictionary<string,string>
  • Don't loop through the items. Just set it directly

So it would like like this

var dictionary = new Dictionary<string,string>();
var key = "key";
var value = "value";
dictionary[key] = null; // set some trigger here

// set value
dictionary[key] = value;

Assert.AreEqual(value, dictionary[key]);
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