Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got Parent - Child relationship OneToOne, but two of them. Annotations are not good but it produces good DB schema, yet code is not working. If I try to save Parent instance, Hibernate at first tries to save child1 and child2 - but it breaks FK defined in Child -> because owner doesn't exist yet in DB...So I need to save Parent and then child1, and child2.

If I could do that it doesn't help, because when I try to load Parent, Hibernate will not know which record in Child table belongs to child1 or child2...So in this case I would need to specify one condition in join for child1 something like "where type = 1" and for child2 "where type = 2"...

Just to clarify: in Child table there will be zero or one child for one Parent with ChildType.A (always child1) and zero or one child with ChildType.B (always child2).

I need to save xml which looks like this:

<parent id="" oid="">
   <child1 (and other attributes)>
   <child2 (and other attributes)>
<parent>

Both child1 and child2 elements are the same type therefore are type of Child in java classes. Only difference is element name (in java I differentiate them with ChildType). Only identification for children are id and oid attributes from parent. They points to another Parent hence target in Child.

I need to change annotations somehow to get this working...Do you guys have some ideas, because I'm really stuck???

Parent.java

public class Parent {

    private String oid
    private Long id;

    private Child child1;
    private Child child2;

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(generator = "IdGenerator")
    @GenericGenerator(name = "IdGenerator", strategy = "com.example.IdGenerator")
    @Column(name = "id")
    public Long getId() {
        return id;
    }

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(generator = "OidGenerator")
    @GenericGenerator(name = "OidGenerator", strategy = "com.example.OidGenerator")
    @Column(name = "oid", nullable = false, updatable = false, length = 36)
    public String getOid() {
        return oid;
    }

    @OneToOne(optional = true, fetch = FetchType.EAGER)
    @Cascade({org.hibernate.annotations.CascadeType.ALL})
    public Child getChild1() {
        return child1;
    }

    @OneToOne(optional = true, fetch = FetchType.EAGER)
    @Cascade({org.hibernate.annotations.CascadeType.ALL})
    public Child getChild2() {
        return child2;
    }
}

Child.java

public class Child {

    private Parent owner;
    private String ownerOid;
    private Long ownerId;
    private ChildType type;

    private Parent target;

    @MapsId("owner")
    @ManyToOne(fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
    @PrimaryKeyJoinColumns({
            @PrimaryKeyJoinColumn(name = "owner_oid", referencedColumnName = "oid"),
            @PrimaryKeyJoinColumn(name = "owner_id", referencedColumnName = "id")
    })
    public Parent getOwner() {
        return owner;
    }

    @MapsId("target")
    @ManyToOne(fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
    @PrimaryKeyJoinColumns({
            @PrimaryKeyJoinColumn(name = "target_oid", referencedColumnName = "oid"),
            @PrimaryKeyJoinColumn(name = "target_id", referencedColumnName = "id")
    })
    public Parent getTarget() {
        return target;
    }

    @Id
    @Column(name = "owner_id")
    public Long getOwnerId() {
        if (ownerId == null && owner != null) {
            ownerId = owner.getId();
        }
        return ownerId;
    }

    @Id
    @Column(name = "owner_oid", length = 36)
    public String getOwnerOid() {
        if (ownerOid == null && owner != null) {
            ownerOid = owner.getOid();
        }
        return ownerOid;
    }

    @Id
    @Column(name = "target_id")
    public Long getTargetId() {
        if (targetId == null && target != null) {
            targetId = target.getId();
        }
        return targetId;
    }

    @Id
    @Column(name = "target_oid", length = 36)
    public String getTargetOid() {
        if (targetOid == null && target != null) {
            targetOid = target.getOid();
        }
        if (targetOid == null) {
            targetOid = "";
        }
        return targetOid;
    }

    @Id
    @Enumerated(EnumType.ORDINAL)
    public ChildType getType() {
        if (type == null) {
            return ChildType.A;
        }
        return type;
    }
}

ChildType.java

public enum ChildType {
    A, B;
}

I also tried to use mappedBy approach mappedBy approach but there are still problems with loading - I can't tell hibernate which child record belogs to which child class member variable.

share|improve this question
    
So a Parent has 2 children and the Child has a owner and a target. So how are child1 and child2 related to the owner and the target? Is it like this parent.id=1, child.id=2, parent.child1=2, child.owner=1..? Or are they unrelated? Or is child1 owned by the parent and child2 targeted by the parent? –  barsju Mar 28 '12 at 8:44
    
Parent is "owner" in child1 and child2 like... I hate comment editing :))) I will update question. –  vilo Mar 28 '12 at 8:46
    
Question updated Parent-Child relations ship was explained more throughly :) –  vilo Mar 28 '12 at 8:54
    
Why does a parent have both id and oid? –  barsju Mar 28 '12 at 9:32
    
it's composite primary key –  vilo Mar 28 '12 at 10:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+200

there are too many things I don't quite get in your solution to give a good answer but just some thoughts:

Consider using inheritance instead of ChildType enum. So you would have ChildA and ChildB extending Child.

That way you Parent can have:

private ChildA child1;
private ChildB child2;

Instead of having a composite primary key, I would consider using a unique auto generated key and then add a unique constraint on on the other id and oid fields. It should make the child parent relationships easier and you can have different parent implementation for ChildA and ChildB:

In ChildA:
@OneToOne(mappedBy="child1")
public Parent getParent() {
    return parent;
}

And

In ChildB:
@OneToOne(mappedBy="child2")
public Parent getParent() {
    return parent;
}

And in Child just:

public abstract Parent getParent();

Now the whole Parent/Owner/Target thing I still didn't quite grasp.

share|improve this answer
    
this is a solution. Hibernate will save Person, but you can't load Person from db, because hibernate won't know which Child record belong to which child (child1 or child2)...I know that child record with ChildType.A has to be child1, ChildType.B record is child2, but hibernate doesn't know. And about that parent/owner/target...I have xml element which has two sub elements. So subelements have Parent as owner. I can't create another key for children because I don't have place for it in xml. So children have PK mapped from "parent" element...is it clear now? thanks –  vilo Mar 28 '12 at 14:22
    
Inheritance - single table with discriminator column was it. really thanks. I tried to do it maually with my ChildType. thanks man, you just saved my day :) –  vilo Apr 7 '12 at 16:22

I see two problems with using one-to-one references:

  1. Parent has zero or one child1, and zero or one child2. My understanding is that you use one to one when it's ALWAYS one.
  2. Your IDs are getting really complicated. The idea with one-to-one is that the ID's are the same between the two entities, and you've got Parent with a two-part primary key, and Child with a different four part primary key.

The other addendum to 2. is that if you're using 1-1, then the ID of parent and child should be the same. But if the parent has two children, they can't both have the same ID! So there's a real data modeling problem. Also, the fact that child type is part of the key is also a bad smell, cause I expect child type is part of your business logic,

I think what you want is what Hibernate calls a 'unidirectional one-to-one association on a foreign key'. The Hibernate ORM manual shows how to do this in XML, here's an example with Annotations, although without the unique property set.

I'm going to assume there's no outside business reason why your primary keys have to be the way that they are, and suggest that you

  1. Change Parent and Child to each have to have a single field primary key, using @Id and @GeneratedValue(strategy=GenerationType.AUTO).
  2. Change Parent to have the references to child1 and child2 be @ManyToOne(unique=true)
  3. If you want, change Child as detailed in the Hibernate manual so that it has a reference to the Parent.

You will lose the 'feature' that parents and children have the same ID, but gain massive simplicity in your object ID scheme, making database operations faster and the code simpler to read.

If there is an outside reason that you haven't specified as to why Parent and/or Child need multi-part primary keys, this answer will need some modification.

I also second the point that @barsju made about using inheritance, or even entirely independent classes, to do the two Child types. If you use ID's the way I lay out here, you can make Parent have references to the concrete subtypes, and the query will work fine.

share|improve this answer
    
as I stated I only have oid and id as keys, because if I create another single field key for Child it will be lost. I select Parent from DB, transform it to XML (or DOM) -> now I don't have place where to put the Child PK...then I modify DOM somewhere and after that I transform XML (or DOM) to Parent and Child POJOs...and I'm doomed, no more PK in there...children will be always created as new. XML schema is fixed. I know that this PK stuff is madness :) As @barsju said - inheritance is probably solution. Didn't have time to test it, will do in next few days. –  vilo Apr 5 '12 at 12:53
    
OK, I didn't see any mention in the question about loading via Hibernate and then converting to XML. So these Java classes are some kind of intermediate representation? When you say you "don't have place...to put the Child PK", does that mean you don't have control over the XML representation, and can't add attributes to it? –  sharakan Apr 5 '12 at 13:01
    
Yes. These are only POJO classes to save/load XML representation from relational DB and I can't change XSD schema. I mentioned it in question - in I need to save XML.. part as well as in some other comments. But thanks for help anyway :) –  vilo Apr 6 '12 at 9:54
    
So you're both persisting these objects to an RDBMS with both Hibernate on the one hand, and XML on the other? Sounds a bit odd, but ok. I know you've already accepted another answer, but given the XML you detail, you can make the changes I suggest to Child, and the Parent->Child relationship, and you'll be all set. –  sharakan Apr 8 '12 at 12:54
    
Nope. Application works with XML, therefore I'm persiting XML objects in RDBMS and XSD schema for that objects is fixed. But thank you as well for the ideas. –  vilo Apr 9 '12 at 13:34

Use @JoinColumns and define a filter

In Parent.java:

@OneToOne(optional = true, fetch = FetchType.EAGER)
@JoinColumns ({
    @JoinColumn(name="id", referencedColumnName = "owner_id"),
    @JoinColumn(name="oid", referencedColumnName = "owner_oid"),
})
@FilterJoinTable(name="type", condition="type = 'A'")
@Cascade({org.hibernate.annotations.CascadeType.ALL})
public Child getChild1() {
    return child1;
}

@OneToOne(optional = true, fetch = FetchType.EAGER)
@JoinColumns ({
    @JoinColumn(name="id", referencedColumnName = "owner_id"),
    @JoinColumn(name="oid", referencedColumnName = "owner_oid"),
})
@FilterJoinTable(name="type", condition="type = 'B'")
@Cascade({org.hibernate.annotations.CascadeType.ALL})
public Child getChild2() {
    return child2;
}

I never used filters, so the exact syntax may be a little bit different, but that should give you the idea how it should work.

By the way, you can make the design easier if you introduce a single id column (not a composite id as you do it now). In that case the type don't need to be part of the id. Hibernate does not really get happy with composite ids. Nevertheless composite ids work and they don't have anything to do with your problem. The filter should work in the same way then.

share|improve this answer
    
This will not work. I'm not really sure about saving Person but load will throw exception for sure. You can probably save it like this - Person (id=1,oid=1), Child(id=1,oid=1,type=A), Child(id=1,oid=1,type=B) in DB (of course simplyfied) but when you want to load Person with id=1 and oid=1, hibernate don't know what to set to child1 - it founds two children for it, and the same for child2 –  vilo Apr 4 '12 at 18:18
    
OK, now I see what's your problem. In this case you have to add a filter. I modified my answer, please re-read it. –  Johanna Apr 5 '12 at 6:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.