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I wrote a regular expression trying to match some html code but I can't quite it to work. I'm having a problem with the part after "wp-caption".

class=(["\'])(?:[\w\s])*?wp-caption[\s\1]

The code I want to match:

class="wp-caption"
class='wp-caption'
class="wp-caption foo"
class="foo wp-caption"

I match the first three results but not the fourth. I don't think the \1 is working. Any thoughts?

BTdubs I've been using http://regexpal.com/ for testing purposes.

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1  
I've never seen "BTdubs" before. That's delightful. –  octern Mar 27 '12 at 21:12
    
You're right, back references doesn't works inside brackets. –  aMarCruz Jul 15 at 23:36

3 Answers 3

This might work too

class\s*=\s*(['"])(?:(?!\1).)*wp-caption(?:(?!\1).)*\1
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class=(["\'])(?:[\w\s])*wp-caption[\w\s]*\1
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It's not working because backreferences can't be referenced from within a character class (the stuff inside the square brackets []). As mentioned in another answer, you could use a backrefence in a lookahead, unless you're using a language that doesn't support lookaround...

In short, what you need to do depends upon the language you are using (regex implementations depend heavily on what language is implementing them)

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I haven't even heard about lookaheads. So why does the backreference work with the first three examples? –  BFTrick Mar 31 '12 at 16:52
    
@BFTrick honestly, I'm not sure why it would work with the first two - I'm fairly proficient in several flavors of regex (including JavaScript, which I am assuming you are using) and I don't see how your expression could match the first two lines, but I cut and pasted your example expression and code into regexpal.com just to be sure, and it only matches the third line in your example... –  Code Jockey Apr 4 '12 at 20:36
    
@BFTrick [\s\1] means essentially "match either a whitespace character (space, tab, CrLf, and others), a backslash, or a literal digit 1" - if you were trying to identify any class attribute that contained wp-caption, then I assume you removed some other classes that were following wp-caption and matches were only successful because the they hit on the whitespace between those classes - they should not be able to match the first two lines in your example code using your expression. -->More info on 'lookaround' –  Code Jockey Apr 4 '12 at 20:41

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