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I have a list:

L = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6] 

and I want to print

1 B 2 J 3 C 4 A 5 J 6 X 

from that list.

How do I do that?

Do I have to make another list and zip them up, or is there some way I can have the letters in my format specifier?

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11  
Where does theses letters come from? –  Jeremy D Mar 27 '12 at 21:04
    
They are constant. They are going to be SI unit prefixes, like yotta, zeta, kilo, mega, ... –  Ricky Bobby Cole Mar 27 '12 at 21:10
    
Ok, it was easy to guess. (irony) –  Jeremy D Mar 27 '12 at 21:12
2  
You'll also have hella for ten to the twenty-seventh, right? –  Platinum Azure Mar 27 '12 at 21:12
2  
What the hell? When was that finalized? –  Platinum Azure Mar 27 '12 at 21:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A nice way to do this is have a dictionary of numbers to prefixes:

prefixes = {1: 'B', 2: 'J', 3: 'C', 4: 'A', 5: 'J', 6: 'X'}

Then you can do:

print ' 'join('%s %s' % (num, prefix) for num, prefix in prefixes.itervalues())

If you also have a list of letters:

nums = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
ltrs = ['B', 'J', 'C', 'A', 'J', 'X']

print ' '.join('%s %s' % (num, ltr) for num, ltr in zip(nums, ltrs)
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ltrs doesn't have to be a list, it can just be a string. –  agf Mar 27 '12 at 21:20
    
Only for single character elements, of course... –  Platinum Azure Mar 27 '12 at 21:24

You could do it either way:

L = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

from itertools import chain

# new method
print "{} B {} J {} C {} A {} J {} X".format(*L)
# old method
print "%s B %s J %s C %s A %s J %s X" % tuple(L)
# without string formatting
print ' '.join(chain.from_iterable(zip(map(str, L), 'BJCAJX')))

See the docs on str.format and string formatting.

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