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We use TFS 2010 continuous integration automated builds that get kicked off on every check-in. I recently changed the process template to build Debug and Release in parallel on different build agents as opposed to sequentially on the same agent.

Ever since then, we are itermittently seeing a build failure due to the following error. It happens frequently enough that it is unacceptable (every 5th-10th build or so).

"TF203059: The label already exists. Retry the command with a different label name"

I haven't been able to figure out a specific pattern that causes this to happen. Has anyone come across this before? Is there a change that should be made to the Create Label activity in the build process?

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This greatly depends on how you have customized your build process template. Can you describe a little closer how you 've set this up? –  pantelif Mar 28 '12 at 12:09
    
Hi pantelif, thanks for your response. I used the build process template shared here as an example: blogs.msdn.com/b/jimlamb/archive/2010/09/14/… –  LiliaP Mar 28 '12 at 17:02
    
Some more details: I added a ParallelForEach control flow to the build process sequence and placed the entire RunOnAgent block inside it. CreateLabel activity was part of the RunOnAgent block so now it gets executed for each build flavor. The label gets set to build number which is in the format $(Date:yyyy.MM.dd)$(Rev:.rr). As a result both debug and release will use the same label. This doesn't cause issues most of the times, but we do get intermittent build failures –  LiliaP Mar 28 '12 at 17:09

2 Answers 2

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There are a couple of issues that can come from parallelization. The labels is one, and modifying work items is the second. There may be more, but that's what I've run into. If you move both into the single threaded part, it should fix your problems. However, that often comes with its own host of problems. IIRC, labeling requires you to map the workspace and get latest before you can label, so if you have a lot of files, this can mitigate any performance benefits of parallelizing. For the work items, the problem can occur because one process modifies the work item after another branch reads it, and TFS pitches a fit that it's changed so it cannot update.

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Rob - thank you so much for your response! I've been out of the country and just now getting back to this project. Our solution isn't that big, so getting latest won't take that long. –  LiliaP Apr 18 '12 at 18:42
    
Rob - a question about your solution to this problem: how did you move labeling into the single threaded part? Did you accomplish this by editing the template in the Visual Studio Build Process editing UI or did you have to implement a custom solution? –  LiliaP Apr 18 '12 at 18:43
    
It's been a while, but I think I moved it back to the single threaded part by editing the Workflow –  Rob Rodi Apr 20 '12 at 3:27

In case of The parallel builds for Configurations "Debug" and "Release". It tries to put the same label twice, so can creates problems. in particularly we need to provide that label only once. So, In this case to avoid such issue we can put a condition for either configuration to put the label and skip giving label for the second configuration.

use this if condition:

if (configuration="Release") Then (CreateLabel) else [You have to leave This blank for Debug as we have already provided that label once for "Release" condition]

In This way I have solved my problem related with duplicate label problem.

"TF203059: The label already exists. Retry the command with a different label name"

I hope it will also work for you perfectly fine for parallel builds.

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