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I'm pretty sure that this how other IDE's do it, e.g. on windows eclipse uses the output of gdb from MinGW (the windows port of GNU toolchain) to map where execution is in the source code and what values variables hold, etc. I'm stuck using gdb via a script that prepares our application in a chroot and does some other bootstrap for debug purposes. Once the script starts moving, the output is all gdb. Is there any way that I can configure emacs so that it will use gdb's output and allow for a sort of graphical debugger, comparable to that of eclipse or ms visual studio?

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I heard emacs has a marvelous gdb interface. But I never used it. – kindahero Mar 28 '12 at 3:33
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emacs has a gdb-mode. I've used it once or twice. If that fails or if you don't like it maybe this will help users.snap.net.nz/~nickrob – sessyargc.jp Mar 28 '12 at 3:36

The M-x gdb command expects GDB to be put in a particular mode. In Emacs-21/22 gdb had to be started with --fullname, in Emacs-23, it needs --annotate=3 and in Emacs-24 it needs -i=mi, so the most likely problem is that your script fails to provide this argument. BTW in Emacs-23/24 you can still use the old --fullname mode, under the name M-x gud-gdb: it's less fancy but I find it more reliable.

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+1. You'll also probably want to take a look at gdb-many-windows to get the sort of GUI you might be used to. – Francesco Mar 29 '12 at 7:39

I'm not sure, but try M-x gdb and then do like this M-x gdb-many-windows , maybe that can help you..

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You can run gdb directly from Emacs via M-x gdb. When you do that, you can interact with it directly through buffers that visit code files. For instance, in a code file buffer, you can hit C-Space to set a breakpoint.

Check out the documentation for more info on Emacs's GDB Graphical Interface.

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How are you running the script? If you can run it as the gdb command then emacs will probably be able to consume its output.

I haven't used gdb from emacs in a long time but it seems M-x gdb asks for the external command to execute. Can you give your script name there?

If you don't know gdb-mode at all, it might be a good idea try it out on a smaller project first.

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I've tried running the script by replacing the gdb command. It starts, but it appears that my input to it is never actually received by gdb. For instance if I type break class::method and press enter, the text I've entered is highlighted, but I never get another input prompt, like perhaps the input isn't getting to the shell that gdb is running in. – Joey Carson Mar 28 '12 at 13:42

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