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Consider the following JavaScript:

for (var i = 0; i < foo.length; i++) {
    DoStuff(foo[i]);
}

for (var i = 0; i < bar.length; i++) {
    DoStuff(bar[i]);
}

This code seemed fine to me as a developer coming from a C# background. Unfortunately, this code generates a warning with Visual Studio.

Message 1 'i' is already defined

Okay, sure. It is clear what is happening -- the first declaration of i does not confine i's scope to that of the for loop. I could do a couple of things:

for (var i = 0; i < foo.length; i++) {
    DoStuff(foo[i]);
}

for (i = 0; i < bar.length; i++) {
    DoStuff(bar[i]);
}

I find this solution incorrect due to the fact that the second for loop now has its 'correctness' coupled to that of the first loop -- if I remove the first loop the second loop has to change. Alternatively:

for (var fooIndex = 0; i < foo.length; i++) {
    DoStuff(foo[fooIndex]);
}

for (var barIndex = 0; barIndex  < bar.length; barIndex++) {
    DoStuff(bar[barIndex]);
}

This seems better, and is what I am currently settled on, but I am unhappy with the potentially long names. I make the naming standard of my indices dependent on the variable they are iterating over to guarantee unique name declarations. Unfortunately, If I have a list called "potentialDiagramImages" I don't really want to do:

foreach(var potentialDiagramImagesIndex in potentialDiagramImages){
    var foo = potentialDiagramImages[potentialDiagramImagesIndex];
}

This starts to edge on 'too long of a variable name' in my eyes. I don't know if SO agrees with me, though. In addition, the initial problem still exists with this implementation if I have to iterate over the same list twice in the same scope (for whatever reason).

Anyway, I am just curious how others tackle this scoping dilemma.

share|improve this question
    
I think when you say for (var barIndex = 0; i < bar.length; i++) { you mean for (var barIndex = 0; barIndex < bar.length; barIndex++) {. Am I right? I'll delete this comment either way... –  AlejoBrz Mar 27 '12 at 22:09
    
Fixed. ;) Thanks for reading thoroughly. –  Sean Anderson Mar 27 '12 at 22:10
    
when you do this, you have to make sure you do: if(potentialDiagramImages.hasOwnProperty(potentialDiagramImagesIndex)){var foo = potentialDiagramImages[potentialDiagramImagesIndex];} –  Relic Mar 27 '12 at 22:10

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Declare i before the loops (at the top of the function's body):

var i;
for (i = 0; i < foo.length; i++) {
    DoStuff(foo[i]);
}

for (i = 0; i < bar.length; i++) {
    DoStuff(bar[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
this is the correct answer... –  Relic Mar 27 '12 at 22:08

Just FYI and nobody else mentioned it so far, ECMAscript since edition 5 also offers you some nice little helper methods on the Array.prototype. For instance

foo.forEach(function( elem ) {
    DoStuff( elem );
});

bar.forEach(function( elem ) {
    DoStuff( elem );
});

This way you avoid the confusion with function level scope and variable hoisting. ES5 is widely supported across all browsers, you could (and probably should) include a little ES5-shim library for old'ish browsers anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the ECMAscript5 update. kinda neat but what's the overhead involved in this vs his approach? –  Relic Mar 27 '12 at 22:14
    
@Relic: quick jsperf jsperf.com/foreach-vs-for-sotest. Since there is a function invoked per iteration, the methodical loop is of course slower. But it still performs really fast unless you're doing some graphic-updates or performance critical tasks. –  jAndy Mar 27 '12 at 22:17
    
This is super useful, just FYI! I'm using it all over the place now. Thanks so much! –  Sean Anderson Mar 28 '12 at 21:10
    
@SeanAnderson: yaayy its shiny I know :-) I'm also using it quite everywhere accept, as I mentioned, where you think performance is ultimate important. Have fun! :) –  jAndy Mar 28 '12 at 21:21

Javascript doesn't have block level scope so

for (var i = 0; i < foo.length; i++) {
    DoStuff(foo[i]);
}

creates a variable that is scoped to enclosing function or global if no function encloses it. So the best way is to declare the index variable outside

var i;

for (i = 0; i < foo.length; i++) {
    DoStuff(foo[i]);
}

for (i = 0; i < bar.length; i++) {
    DoStuff(bar[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
FYI, you left the second var in –  nrabinowitz Mar 27 '12 at 22:09
    
@nrabinowitz, fixed it already, thanks for pointing it out. –  amit_g Mar 27 '12 at 22:10
    
-1 for duplicating an answer, see first response. –  Relic Mar 27 '12 at 22:12
2  
This is really more of a discussion for Meta. But see stackoverflow.com/privileges/vote-down - downvotes are to mark bad, sloppy, or incorrect answers, and this isn't one of them. –  nrabinowitz Mar 27 '12 at 22:33
1  
@Wiseguy - damn you and your logic :). Probably true. –  nrabinowitz Mar 28 '12 at 5:12

I particularly don't care about variables being declared twice. I don't like declaring a variable too far from where it's being used, even if the declaration gets hoisted. You can ignore the warning. The main bug that can happen from hoisting is if you have two statements that declare but don't initialize a variable, since newbies may expect the second declaration to set the variable to undefined.

Like others have suggested, if you really want to make Visual Studio happy, you just declare your index variables at the top of your function, like jslint wants you to.

share|improve this answer
    
I have to disagree here (though not so strongly that I'd downvote). Declaring the variable twice might lead you to believe that you aren't affecting the value of the previous declaration when you reassign the variable - especially if the variable is used in a closure, this can get disastrous quickly. –  nrabinowitz Mar 27 '12 at 22:13
    
@nrabinowitz: JSHint can give you warnigs if your variables are being used "out of scope". I find that manually hoisting variables silences these useful warnings and just serves to act as a reminder of something I already know. –  hugomg Mar 27 '12 at 22:18
    
@missingno - yeah, I go back and forth on manual hoisting, and generally do it only within relatively small scopes. But declaring a variable twice is, IMHO, sloppy coding, and usually (though not in the OP's case) indicates that you've actually forgotten about the first declaration - that seems likely to lead to errors. –  nrabinowitz Mar 27 '12 at 22:22
1  
@nrabinowitz: You can say it's your opinion, but to call it sloppy coding is just not accurate. Declaring it twice is better than reusing the variable for a different purpose, IMHO, makes it easier to copy/paste into a new method. –  Juan Mendes Mar 28 '12 at 14:52

I usually just increment my variables, if I used i next is j, k, l...etc.

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2  
I'd rather do that only in inner loops –  Juan Mendes Mar 27 '12 at 22:11
    
This should be left for parent child relationships in loops, his approach is acceptable. –  Relic Mar 27 '12 at 22:13

As has already mentioned in other answers, something you can do that is not completely horrible is to declare the index variable outside both loops. This uncouples the loops from each other (and you can remover the first one without causing errors) but there are two things I don't like about that: its easy to remove the loops entirely and forget about the variable and moving the variable up silences "variable is used out of scope" warnings.

For this reason there are two alternatives I like:

  1. Use a looping function instead of a for loop

    array.forEach(function(elem){
        doSomething(elem);
    });
    

    This has the additional advantage of not being prone to the closures-inside-for-loops bug.

  2. Ignore that warning.

    I personaly disagree with this particular warning and would consider disabling if that were possible.

share|improve this answer

JavaScript has functional scope, and due to variable hoisting, the var statement will actually be executed at the top of the containing function. it's advisable to place a single var statement at the top of your scope, and use variables as needed:

(function () {
    "use strict";
    var i,
        l;
    for (i = 0, l = foo.length; i < l; i++) {
        DoStuff(foo[i]);
    }
    for (i = 0, l = bar.length; i < l; i++) {
        DoStuff(bar[i]);
    }
}());
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