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I have a problem where I have a bunch of functions that take a long time to execute and each one returns a boolean True/False. I apply a huge boolean expression to all of the functions to get an overall True/False score. Currently my code is not function based so all functions are executed and then the large boolean expression is applied. I already figured out that making them functions would allow for sub expressions which short-circut to prevent some function calls. What I need now is a way to reorder the expressions such that I have a minimum number of calls.

Considering the following code (horrible code example but you should get the idea):

def q():
    print "q"
    return False

def r():
    print "r"
    return False

def s():
    print "s"
    return False

def a():
    print "a"
    return False

def b():
    print "b"
    return False

def c():
    print "c"
    return False


def d():
    print "d"
    return False

def i():
    print "i"
    return False

def j():
    print "j"
    return False


(q() or r() or s()) and (a() and b() and c() and (i() or j())) 

In this case you see q r s printed. All are False so it short circuits. In this case though, a b or c should be evaluated first since if any one of those is False the entire expression is False. Assume that the expression at the end is generated by a user such that I can't hard code the best possible order. I'm thinking there is a pretty easy algorithm that I am missing.

Two other things:

1.) What if I allow other logic such as "not"? 2.) Could I assign each function a score based on how long it might take to run and then calculate that in?

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2 Answers 2

To optimize your expression, you need to know two things: the cost of each function, and the probability that it will short circuit. Once you have that, you can evaluate each sub-expression to produce the same terms; trying every permutation of parameter order will show which arrangement has the lowest cost.

def evaluate_or(argument_evaluation_list):
    total_cost = 0.0
    probability_of_reaching = 1.0
    for cost, probability_of_true in argument_evaluation_list:
        total_cost += probability_of_reaching * cost
        probability_of_reaching *= 1.0 - probability_of_true
    return total_cost, 1.0 - probability_of_reaching

def evaluate_and(argument_evaluation_list):
    total_cost = 0.0
    probability_of_reaching = 1.0
    for cost, probability_of_true in argument_evaluation_list:
        total_cost += probability_of_reaching * cost
        probability_of_reaching *= probability_of_true
    return total_cost, probability_of_reaching

def evaluate_not(argument_evaluation)
    cost, probability_of_true = argument_evaluation
    return cost, 1.0 - probability_of_true
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Your formula as it is in CNF (btw you don't need those parenthesis around top-level ors), which is quite nice for computational complexity, it's really simple formula. Since you don't have not at the moment, I don't really know if it is necessary to look for some kind of complex algorithms, your formula is already simple enough I would say. But you could definitely try some kind of heuristics (like to start with evaluation of clauses having as few literals as possible so you fail as fast as possible... the problem is that even if you start with a clause having just one literal, to compute the function may be more expensive than computing larger clauses, so yes, it would make sense not to sort them according to size but according to expected computational complexity).

At the moment you incorporate not, you can find some additional stuff useful. Particularly how to convert those into CNF again and also ideas from resolution could be useful for you.

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