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This is a function in my program. With the cout statement there the program compiles and runs. If I remove the cout statement I get a segmentation fault returned. I'm using G++ compiler on linux mint. Anyone have any thoughts on this?

int findFactors(int n,int factors[],int numFactors)
{
  int m=n;
  int k=2;
  int i;

 while(m!=1)
 {
  for(k=2;k<=m;k++)
  {
   if(m%k==0)
    {
      factors[i]=k;
      cout<<"Prime Factor: "<<factors[i]<<endl;//This is the offending statement!
      factors[i++];
      numFactors++;
      break;
    }
  }
   m=(m/k);
 }

  return numFactors;
}   
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1  
Please include how this function is being called, including the declarations of any parameters you're passing to the function. My bet is that you're running outside the bounds of the factors[] array. –  Justin ᚅᚔᚈᚄᚒᚔ Mar 27 '12 at 22:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

i is uninitialized, so accessing factors[i] is undefined behavior and anything can happen.

Also, what is the statement factors[i++]; supposed to do?

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Ok I initialised i and that has removed the segmentation fault. My program is now gone horribly wrong but this particular problem is solved! I need to remember to initialise variables its a very bad habit I have. –  adohertyd Mar 27 '12 at 22:47

I have the same thought on this as most times when a program is probably doing incorrect memory access: run it under valgrind. Valgrind will find and report many common errors for you, before your program crashes, or in some cases even if it never crashes.

If you can't run valgrind (e.g. your platform doesn't have it), you could at least run your program in a debugger and tell us which line it crashes on.

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