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In powershell you can use pushd (an alias for Push-Location) and popd (an alias for Pop-Location) to push items onto and pop items off of a location stack.

This is very similar to bash's pushd and popd functionality for a stack of directories.

But one other nice feature of bash is that you can use pushd all by itself to swap the top two locations on the stack. So you can flip back and forth very quickly between one location and another. And it also takes an argument like pushd +3 so you can swap with a location that's a few elements down in your stack.

Is there any way to do this with powershell?

As an example, in bash:

$ pwd
/bin
$ pushd ~
~ /bin
$ pwd
/home/hopper
$ pushd
/bin ~
$ pwd
/bin
$ pushd
~ /bin
$ pwd
/home/hopper
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2 Answers 2

You can access your stack using Get-Location with the -Stack switch. As the nature of a stack it is LIFO. Get-Location -Stack creates a System.Management.Automation.PathInfoStack object so you can access individual stack items like this:

  • $stack.ToArray()[-1] : Gets the first pushed item.
  • $stack.ToArray()[0] : Gets the last pushed item. Same as $stack.Peek().

So the answer is that there is not built in switch for Push-Location to modify your stack order but you can create a function to do this. Note that this manipulates the default stack. As the name implies you can create your own stacks using Push-Location -StackName MyStack. You can even change the default stack to your custom stack using Set-Location -StackName MyStack.

I didn't find a way to set the stack object though without using the Pop/Push cmdlets. So I had to implement this in a way that is more difficult than if I could... but here's a little function that allows you to swap the top two paths of the stack.

function Swap-StackTop {
    param ($StackName = "default")
    $origPath = $PWD
    $stack = Get-Location -StackName $StackName
    $stackArray = $stack.ToArray()
    $last = $stackArray[0]
    $beforeLast = $stackArray[1]
    $stackArray[0] = $beforeLast
    $stackArray[1] = $last
    $stackArray | % {Pop-Location}
    Set-Location -Path $stackArray[-1].Path
    $stackArray[($stackArray.Count-2)..0] | % {
        Push-Location $_.Path
    }
    Push-Location -Path $origPath.Path
}

cd C:\
Push-Location 'C:\Users'
Push-Location 'C:\Program Files'
Push-Location C:\Windows
Get-Location -Stack

Output:

Path
----
C:\Program Files
C:\Users
C:\

Now swap the top two paths:

Swap-StackTop
Get-Location -Stack

Output:

Path
----
C:\Users
C:\Program Files
C:\
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Nice little function there; you should contribute it to pscx.codeplex.com –  x0n Mar 28 '12 at 2:20
    
This is an interesting hack. It doesn't look too hard to extend to a generalized swapn. –  Omnifarious Mar 28 '12 at 22:17

There has been similar functionality built into the PowerShell Community Extensions for years :-) e.g.:

48 >  cd C:\inetpub
C:\inetpub
49 >  cd C:\Windows\System32
C:\Windows\System32
50 >  cd -
C:\inetpub
51 >  cd +
C:\Windows\System32
52 >  cd

     # Directory Stack:
   --- ----------------
     0 C:\Users\Keith
     1 C:\inetpub
->   2 C:\Windows\System32

53 >  cd -0
C:\Users\Keith

Although it isn't quite a swap, the backward (-) and forward (+) metaphor is pretty well established these days. And you skip to any location in the location history by specifying -<num>. In fact, and this was a very handy addition suggested by a PSCX user, you can CD to a file file (which just cds to the dir the file is in) e.g.:

cd $profile

In order to enable this functionality in PSCX you have to specify the Pscx.UserPreference.ps1 file when you import the module e.g.:

Import-Module PSCX -arg ~\Pscx.UserPreferences.ps1

In this case, I copy the file from the PSCX dir to my home dir and modify to suit my tastes. For more info execute:

cd -?

or

man cd -full

The full source for this nested module is here (on CodePlex).

share|improve this answer
    
That's a pretty nice feature :-) Wish that was built in! I tend to navigate around using env variables and tab completion but this is like having back and forward buttons on your shell :-) –  Andy Arismendi Mar 28 '12 at 5:02
    
This looks interesting, and in some ways nicer than the swapn functionality provided by bash's push +n command. –  Omnifarious Mar 28 '12 at 22:18

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