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I have a file like this:

This is a sentence.
This is another sentence.

I need to put a new line after each character, such that only one character appears on every line, e.g.:

T
h
i
s

i
s

a

s
e
n
t
e
n
c
e
.
T
h
i
s

i
s

a
n
o
t
h
e
r

s
e
n
t
e
n
c
e
.
  • The file is in UTF-8 and contains many non-English characters.
  • It does not matter if spaces or carriage returns have their own line.

How can I remove every character to a new line?

share|improve this question
    
What have you tried? –  Cornstalks Mar 27 '12 at 23:18
    
Do you want every byte on a separate line or every character? –  D.Shawley Mar 27 '12 at 23:27
    
LOL I always have the opposite problem, I end up writing loops that print each character on its own line when they're supposed to be in sentences :P –  Darren Ringer Feb 3 at 23:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Using sed replace every character with itself followed by a newline:

sed 's/\(.\)/\1\n/g' -i filename
share|improve this answer

Using awk's input and output field separators:

awk -F '' -v 'OFS=\n' '{$1=$1}1' filename

or Perl

perl -F// -lane 'print join "\n", @F' filename
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  • sed $'s/./&\\\n/g' (with BSD sed)
    • Or sed 's/./&\n/g' with GNU sed
    • Doesn't include empty lines for linefeeds
  • fold -w1
    • -w specifies width in characters
    • Doesn't include empty lines for linefeeds
  • while IFS= read -r -n1 -d '' c; do printf %s\\n "$c"; done
    • Includes empty lines for linefeeds with -d ''
    • The only option for read specified by POSIX is -r
  • gawk -F '' 'OFS="\n"{$1=$1}1'
    • Or awk 'BEGIN{FS="";OFS="\n"}{$1=$1}1' in nawk (BSD awk, the awk that comes with OS X); it doesn't work with multibyte characters though
    • Neither includes empty lines for linefeeds

All except the nawk command worked with non-ASCII characters in my environment when LC_CTYPE was set to a UTF-8 locale. None collapsed or stripped spaces.

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Not as short as PaulP.R.O.'s answer, but useful if you want to do some operation on each character:

while read -r -n 1 -d '' -u 9
do
    printf "Uppercase '${REPLY^^}', "
    printf "lowercase '${REPLY,,}', "
    printf "literal $(printf "$REPLY" | uniname -bcegpu | tail -1)"
    printf '\n'
done 9< "path"
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Use grep, in example:

$ grep -o . file
$ echo This is a sentence. | grep -o .

or fold:

$ fold -w1 file
$ echo This is a sentence. | fold -w1
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