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My understanding is nothing will happen.

For instance this code:

foreach (var some in (from u in possiblyNullCollection ) ) 
{
    // 
}

Should be guarded as:

if ( possiblyNullCollection != null ) 
{ 
    foreach (var some in (from u in possiblyNullCollection ) ) 
    {
     // 
    }
}

Or is it safe to query a null collection?

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closed as not constructive by M.Babcock, Kirk Woll, Adam Robinson, OscarRyz, p.campbell Mar 28 '12 at 3:05

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

8  
...Have you tried it? –  Adam Robinson Mar 28 '12 at 1:24
1  
Takes like 1 minute to try this out –  BrokenGlass Mar 28 '12 at 1:26
1  
    
That's not a duplicate. –  BoltClock Mar 28 '12 at 1:29
1  
... or a minute to research the many resources online that complain when it doesn't work. Also related –  M.Babcock Mar 28 '12 at 1:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A null collection will throw an exception if you query it with LINQ. You need to check for null.

Empty collections are fine however.

Something to keep in mind is that it's generally considered bad practice for collections to be null. Similar to having null items in a collection, it can cause a lot of bugs.

LINQPad Window showing the results of the query

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What's the common idiom to handle this? To check it as in my second sample? –  OscarRyz Mar 28 '12 at 1:45
4  
Usually the best way to handle it is to not allow the collection to be null to begin with. If it's a class field, initialize it to an empty collection. If it's a method parameter, check it for null at the beginning of the method, and throw an ArgumentNullException if it is. Assuming you have to deal with null collections for whatever reason, you can wrap the foreach in an if block like you did, or you can use the null coalesce operator in the foreach block like this foreach (var some in (from u in (possiblyNullCollection ?? Enumerable.Empty<T>()))) where T is the type of the item. –  Dan Rigby Mar 28 '12 at 1:51

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