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I'm looking for a portable way to a) convert a string to a 64-bit signed integer (int64_t), and b) determine if it won't fit (overflows). Is there any way to do this?

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strtoll is one possibility, but I'm not sure it is portable enough. –  Vaughn Cato Mar 28 '12 at 1:48

5 Answers 5

strtoll is pretty portable anymore. And if not in your case, you could always crib the GNU C runtime library and add that to your project...

errno = 0;
long long val = strtoll (string, NULL, 0);
if (errno == ERANGE)
   // there was an overflow conversion error
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But long int (which is what strtoll returns) isn't guaranteed to be 64-bits, right? –  boyers Mar 28 '12 at 1:50
    
@user793587: it returns long long int, which is almost certain to be 64 bit (or more) if the compiler accepts it. I suppose there could be a problem if long long is a 128 bit value. That could be fixed with some run time checks.... –  wallyk Mar 28 '12 at 1:52
    
strtoll returns a long long, which is guaranteed to be at least 64 bits. –  dan04 Mar 28 '12 at 1:52
    
except that this function doesn't exist on Windows.. right? –  boyers Mar 28 '12 at 7:54
    
@user793587: depends on what compiler you use. gcc has it. –  wallyk Mar 28 '12 at 16:03

Run through the characters of the string one at a time and make your integer. if the character you're parsing will cause an overflow, then you know you're about to overflow. this code is the basic idea- doesn't handle errors or negative numbers, but should give you the idea...

bool ConvertToInt( const char* inString, int64_t& outInt )
{
    int64_t kInt64Max = 0x7fffffffffffffff;
    const char* c = inString;
    outInt = 0;
    while( *c != '\0' )
    {
          int charValue = *c - '0';
          //outInt will be assigned outInt * 10 + charValue, so to check if that will overflow
          //use algebra and move stuff around so that you can do the math without overflowing
          if( outInt > ( kInt64Max - charValue ) / 10 )
          {
               //overflow
               return false;
          }
          outInt = outInt * 10 + charValue;
          ++c;
    }
    return true;
}

if you want full credit on your homework, make sure to handle negative numbers and non-numeric characters. [ Edited to increment c ptr- thanks for the tip :) )

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+1: it is certainly portable. (It could use some error checking, like whether the string has any digits.) –  wallyk Mar 28 '12 at 2:10
    
i'm disappointed that the standard library can't do it for me portably, but this solution seems to be perfect for my needs –  boyers Mar 28 '12 at 6:37
    
wait, when do you get the next character in the string? you seem to initialize c to point to the first character and never change it –  boyers Mar 28 '12 at 6:45
    
also, do you have to worry about truncation when doing ( kInt64Max - charValue ) / 10? i cant think right now –  boyers Mar 28 '12 at 7:49

So a 'long long'? An signed int64_ can hold from –9,223,372,036,854,775,808 to 9,223,372,036,854,775,807, and you can just see that from the string. For example, with std::string:

int stringLength;
string myString("123456789");
stringLength = myString.length();

That code gets the length of your string. To determine whether it overflows just check the number of digits, and if there might be an overflow, check the first digit. To convert to int64_, use casting:

http://www.learncpp.com/cpp-tutorial/44-type-conversion-and-casting/

That link should answer your question. (However it's for C-style strings.) And one last clarification, is your string a std::string or not?

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What if the string is 0x0000000000000000000000000000001? That would not overflow, yet a simple length check is mislead. –  wallyk Mar 28 '12 at 2:08
    
@wallyk, so that's what your strings look like? Hmmm... Would simply ignoring leading zeros do the trick? –  Ernest3.14 Mar 28 '12 at 2:27

To cater for Visual C++ 10.0 (as I write this 11.0 is in beta), which apparently does not have strtoll or any equivalent,

#include <assert.h>     // assert
#include <errno.h>      // errno
#include <stdint.h>     // int64_t
#include <string>       // std::string
#include <stdexcept>    // std::runtime_error, std::range_error
#include <stdlib.h>     // EXIT_FAILURE, EXIT_SUCCESS, strtoll
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

#if defined( _MSC_VER )
#   if _MSC_VER <= 1600
#       include <ole2.h>
        inline long long strtoll( char const *str, char **str_end, int base )
        {
            assert(( "Only base 10 for Visual C++ 10 and earlier", base == 10 ));
            std::wstring const  ws( str, str + strlen( str ) );
            LONG64          result;
            HRESULT const   hr    = VarI8FromStr(
                ws.c_str(), 0, LOCALE_NOUSEROVERRIDE, &result
                );
            switch( hr )
            {
            case S_OK:
                if( str_end != 0 )
                {
                    *str_end = const_cast<char*>( str + strlen( str ) );
                }
                return result;
            case DISP_E_OVERFLOW:
                errno = ERANGE;
                if( str_end != 0 )
                {
                    *str_end = const_cast<char*>( str );
                }
                return (*str == '-'? LLONG_MIN : LLONG_MAX);
            default:
                errno = EILSEQ;
                if( str_end != 0 )
                {
                    *str_end = const_cast<char*>( str );
                }
                return 0;
            }
        }
#   endif
#endif

template< class Type >
bool hopefully( Type const& v ) { return !!v; }

bool throwX( string const& s )      { throw runtime_error( s ); }
bool throwRangeX( string const& s ) { throw range_error( s ); }

int64_t int64From( string const& s )
{
    errno = 0;

    int64_t const   result  = strtoll( s.c_str(), nullptr, 10 );

    if( errno == ERANGE )
        throwRangeX( "int64From: specificed nr too large" );
    else if( errno != 0 )
        throwX( "int64From: parsing failed" );
    return result;
}

int main( int argc, char** argv )
{
    try
    {
        int64_t const x   = int64From( argv[argc - 1] );
        wcout << x << endl;
        return EXIT_SUCCESS;
    }
    catch( runtime_error const& x )
    {
        cerr << "!" << x.what() << endl;
    }
    return EXIT_FAILURE;
}

Then for Visual C++ 10 and earlier, link with [oleaut32.lib].

I tested this with MinGW g++ and Visual C++.

PS: Alternatively you can just an istringstream, but it does not reliably tell you why it failed when it fails – and it seems to be a requirement to detect overflow as such.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Based on a helpful response from Joshua Glazer, I came up with the following solution which does error checking and also works for negative integers:

#define __STDC_LIMIT_MACROS
#include <stdint.h>

// convert a string to an integer, return whether successful
bool string_to_int(string in, int64_t &out) {
  size_t pos = 0;
  if (in.size() == 0)
    return false;
  if (in[pos] == '+')
    pos++;
    out = 0;
  if (in[pos] == '-') {
    pos++;
    while (pos < in.size()) {
      if (in[pos] < '0' || in[pos] > '9')
        return false;
      int c = in[pos]-'0';
      if (out < (INT64_MIN+c)/10)
        return false;
      out = out*10-c;
      pos++;
    }
  } else {
    while (pos < in.size()) {
      if (in[pos] < '0' || in[pos] > '9')
        return false;
      int c = in[pos]-'0';
      if (out > (INT64_MAX-c)/10)
        return false;
      out = out*10+c;
      pos++;
    }
  }
  return true;
}
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