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I am trying to insert data into a table in sorted order, for later fast retrieval. I am using an ordinal column to specify the order of the data. Like so:

SET @ctr = -1;

insert into search_data (trans_id, ordinal)
select trans_id, @ctr:=@ctr+1 
from transactions
order by created;

created is a datetime field.

Doing the select without the insert has the rows coming back in the correct order, but the ctr variable does not increment correctly. E.g.:

+---+----------+--------------+---------------------+
| 1 | trans_id | @ctr:=@ctr+1 | created             |
+---+----------+--------------+---------------------+
| 1 |   131379 |          232 | 2011-10-17 12:27:09 |
| 1 |   131377 |          231 | 2011-10-17 12:24:30 |
| 1 |   131311 |          230 | 2011-10-16 23:44:12 |
| 1 |   131305 |          229 | 2011-10-16 21:57:35 |
| 1 |   129948 |           46 | 2011-10-10 13:24:58 |
| 1 |   129947 |           45 | 2011-10-10 13:24:58 |
| 1 |   129946 |           44 | 2011-10-10 13:24:58 |
| 1 |   129945 |           43 | 2011-10-10 13:24:58 |
| 1 |   129944 |           42 | 2011-10-10 13:24:58 |

This technique has worked for me in MySQL 5.0, 4.x and 3.x. But it doesn't work in 5.1.

It seems like the sort is being done after the variable is incremented, whereas previously the variable was incremented after the sort

Any thoughts?

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subquery it? select trans_id, @ctr:=@ctr+1 from (select trans_id from transactions order by created, trans_id) –  Glenn Mar 28 '12 at 3:17
    
Thank you, Glenn, you saved me a lot of trouble tonight. Post that as an answer and I will "accept" it. –  NXT Mar 28 '12 at 3:31
    
Thanks. I wonder if behaviour changed between releases? I don't know about the mysql rules, but Oracle specifically says to subquery when using rownum: If an ORDER BY clause follows ROWNUM in the same query, then the rows will be reordered by the ORDER BY clause. The results can vary depending on the way the rows are accessed. docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14200/… –  Glenn Mar 28 '12 at 3:37
    
It definitely changed between releases. I've got two windows open with 5.0 and 5.1 side-by-side and can see the different behavior. The new way seems more rational, even if it did break my code. –  NXT Mar 28 '12 at 3:43
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try subquery it:

select trans_id, @ctr:=@ctr+1
  from ( select trans_id
           from transactions
           order by created, trans_id ) as t

asdfasdf

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Thanks again, I edited it to add "as t" to the end to avoid a MySQL error ("Every derived table must have its own alias"). –  NXT Mar 28 '12 at 3:37
    
Or rather I tried to edit it but it told me I had to have at least 6 characters in my edit, so I added asdfasdf, but then it wouldn't let me delete it. –  NXT Mar 28 '12 at 3:39
    
That's funny, I didn't even notice the asdfasdf. Thanks for the edit. I forgot about the alias. Postgres asks for that as well. –  Glenn Mar 28 '12 at 3:43
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There is an apostrophe mark at the end of the initialisation of the ctr variable. Please check if it conforms to the syntax. I think the compiler is getting confused by that apostrophe mark.

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Thanks, but that's just a copy/paste error, the real code is not like that. Fixed in the question. –  NXT Mar 28 '12 at 3:32
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