Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have to modify a few tables in one function. They must all succeed, or all fail. If one operation fails, I want them all to fail. I have the following:

public void foo() throws Exception {
    Connection conn = null;
    try {
        conn = ...;
        conn.setAutoCommit(false);
        grok(conn);
        conn.commit();
    }
    catch (Exception ex) {
        // do I need to call conn.rollback() here?
    }
    finally {
        if (conn != null) {
            conn.close();
            conn = null;
        }
    }
}

private void grok(Connection conn) throws Exception {
    PreparedStatement stmt = null;
    try {
        // modify table "apple" 
        stmt = conn.prepareStatement(...);
        stmt.executeUpdate();
        stmt.close();

        // modify table "orange"
        stmt = conn.prepareStatement(...);
        stmt.executeUpdate();
        stmt.close();

        ...
    }
    finally {
        if (stmt != null) {
            stmt.close();
        }
    }
}

I'm wondering if I need to call rollback() in the case that something goes wrong during this process.

Other info: I'm using connection pooling. In the sample above, I'm also making sure to close each PreparedStatement using finally statements as well, just left out for brevity.

Thank you

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't need to call rollback(). If the connection closes without completing commit() it will be rolled back.

You don't need to set conn to null either; and since the try block starts after conn is initialized (assuming ... cannot evaluate to null) you don't need the != null in finally either.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok updated the example to reflect that conn may be null, so even with the updates I still don't need to call rollback()? Thanks –  user291701 Mar 28 '12 at 13:07
    
Correct, you don't need to call rollback. Your previous example, where conn was initialized before try was better –  Miserable Variable Mar 28 '12 at 14:13

If you call "commit" then the transaction will be committed. If you have multiple insert/update statements and one of them fails, committing will cause the inserts/updates that didn't fail to commit to the database. So yes, if you don't want the other statements to commit to the db, you need to call rollback. What you are essentially doing by setting autocommit to false is allowing multiple statements to be committed or rolledback together. Otherwise each individual statement will automatically commit.

share|improve this answer
    
To clarify my answer, this assumes that you will have multiple statements. In your example where you only have one statement then it will be rolled back automatically. But if you have multiple statements being called in your Java code then you'd want to rollback. –  DavidB Mar 28 '12 at 5:18
    
I updated to show that there are multiple statements (well the variable is reused) - do I still need the rollback? Thanks –  user291701 Mar 28 '12 at 13:07
    
You should code defensively. The above code will work with a single connection and you don't need to explicitly call rollback. But if you were to drop that code into an environment where you have connection pools, you are bound to get strange behavior as other transactions reuse that same connection because connections are frequently never closed in a pool. Personally I would always use rollback unless you can definitely identify it as causing a performance hit (rollbacks are expensive) and you fully understand the transactional behavior of the environment you are working in. –  DavidB Mar 28 '12 at 22:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.