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I want to make a cloning or mapping function where I can specify (once) which properties to copy to the target object.

The whole point here was a usage that looks something like this
(inspired by using GroupBy),

var botchedOrder = db.BuildingOrders.Find(id);
var redo = db.BuildingOrders.Create();
botchedOrder.MapTo(redo, x => new { x.BasePrice, x.FileAttachments, x.Notes });

This is over my head, but I was guessing at something like this,

public static void MapTo<TObject, TProps>(
    this TObject source,
    TObject target,
    Action<TProps> properties) //?
{
    //copy the defined properties from source to target somehow?
    //originally I thought I could make an array of delegates..
}

If this works then I can more easily handle different sets of properties in different ways when I am explicitly cloning or mapping objects. I'd like to stick w/ .NET to do this.

EDIT: forgot to indicate void

share|improve this question
    
I guess you could do something like this - using much reflection) but the first problem is that anonymous types are ... well anonym - so they are not good as a result type (your MapTo) function - so you could only return object or use dynamics ... (or some kind of common interface) all not the best options IMHO –  Carsten König Mar 28 '12 at 5:18
    
oops @CarstenKönig I forgot to mark the method as void - does GroupBy() use reflection? –  Benjamin Mar 28 '12 at 5:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'd recommend looking at AutoMapper since it kind of solves same kinds of problems. Also, different ORM sources (like Massive, Petapoco etc.) all have some implementations (since they need to map data from a DB to an object).

Basically, it works either using reflection - to iterate over given fields/properties and set them to another object (also via refleciton). There are approaches to dynamic method generation using IL Generator or Expression Trees that wrap all the reflection code into one nice and fast method generated and compiled at runtime (thus giving performance boost).

Another way to do would be using dynamics or Dictionaries instead of anonymous class - that would remove "anonimity" problem and would just require to map specific keys on to properties - may be done with reflection again (using for example [MappingAttribute("Key")] for distinction - attribute is a fiction, just to give a general idea).

share|improve this answer
    
AutoMapper is fantastic for to many reasons to mention. –  Erik Philips Mar 28 '12 at 5:46
    
Thanks. I'd appreciate your thoughts on the potential solution I just posted. –  Benjamin Mar 28 '12 at 17:49

This is the most succinct form I can think of without dropping down to reflection, but it does involve repeating property names, so I'm not sure if it's exactly what you want.

public static void MapTo<TObject>(this TObject source, TObject target, params Action<TObject, TObject>[] properties)
{
    foreach (var property in properties)
    {
        property(source, target);
    }
}

Called like:

void Copy(FooBar source, FooBar target)
{
    source.MapTo(target, (s,t) => t.Foo = s.Foo, 
                         (s,t) => t.Bar = s.Bar, 
                         (t,s) => t.Baz = s.Baz);
}

class FooBar
{
    public string Foo { get; set; }
    public string Bar { get; set; }
    public string Baz { get; set; }
}

However, it's more verbose that just doing:

void Copy(FooBar source, FooBar target)
{
    target.Foo = source.Foo;
    target.Bar = source.Bar;
    target.Baz = source.Baz;
}

Is there anything else going on in your copy that make the last example invalid? If not, I would just keep it simple and go for that.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Simon. I think reflection is what I was looking for. I posted a potential solution. –  Benjamin Mar 28 '12 at 19:04

Here is a basic dynamic mapper I wrote. I used a slightly different approach as I extended object and instead of specifying the properties, used ignore properties.

public static class ObjectExtensions
{
  public static void CopyFrom(this object Instance, object Source)
  {
    ObjectExtensions.CopyFrom(Instance, Source, false, null);
  }

  public static void CopyFrom(this object Instance, 
                              object Source, 
                              IEnumerable<string> IgnoreProperties)
  {
    ObjectExtensions.CopyFrom(Instance, Source, false, IgnoreProperties);
  }

  public static void CopyFrom(this object Instance, 
                              object Source, 
                              bool ThrowOnPropertyMismatch, 
                              IEnumerable<string> IgnoreProperties)
  {
    Type sourceType = Source.GetType();

    BindingFlags publicInstanceFlags = BindingFlags.Public 
                                       | BindingFlags.Instance;

    PropertyInfo[] sourceProperties = 
      sourceType.GetProperties(publicInstanceFlags);

    Type instanceType = Instance.GetType();

    foreach (PropertyInfo sourceProperty in sourceProperties)
    {
      if (IgnoreProperties == null
          || (IgnoreProperties.Count() > 0
              && !IgnoreProperties.Contains(sourceProperty.Name)))
     {
       PropertyInfo instanceProperty = 
         instanceType.GetProperty(sourceProperty.Name, publicInstanceFlags);

       if (instanceProperty != null
           && instanceProperty.PropertyType == sourceProperty.PropertyType
           && instanceProperty.GetSetMethod() != null
           && instanceProperty.GetSetMethod().IsPublic)
       {
         instanceProperty.SetValue(Instance, 
                                   sourceProperty.GetValue(Source, null), 
                                   null);
       }
       else 
       if (ThrowOnPropertyMismatch
           && instanceProperty.PropertyType != sourceProperty.PropertyType)
       {
         throw new InvalidCastException(
           string.Format("Unable to cast source {0}.{1} to destination {2}.{3}.",
                         Source.GetType().Name,
                         sourceProperty.Name,
                         Instance.GetType().Name,
                         instanceProperty.Name));
       }
     }
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Yes, different sets of properties could be handled differently when mapping. This is very similar to what I was thinking. I think I found a way to get the anonymous type syntax that I was looking for and posted it as an answer. –  Benjamin Mar 28 '12 at 17:41

A common way of doing this is by using expression trees which can represent the way certain types should map to one another. A primitive stripped down example of such is:

public static void MapTo<TInput, TOutput>(this TInput input, TOutput output, Expression<Func<TInput, TOutput, bool>> expression)
        where TInput : class
        where TOutput : class
    {
        if (expression == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("expression");

        Stack<Expression> unhandeledExpressions = new Stack<Expression>();

        unhandeledExpressions.Push(expression.Body);

        while (unhandeledExpressions.Any())
        {
            Expression unhandeledExpression = unhandeledExpressions.Pop();

            switch (unhandeledExpression.NodeType)
            {
                case ExpressionType.AndAlso:
                    {
                        BinaryExpression binaryExpression = (BinaryExpression)unhandeledExpression;
                        unhandeledExpressions.Push(binaryExpression.Left);
                        unhandeledExpressions.Push(binaryExpression.Right);
                    }
                    break;
                case ExpressionType.Equal:
                    {
                        BinaryExpression binaryExpression = (BinaryExpression)unhandeledExpression;

                        MemberExpression leftArgumentExpression = binaryExpression.Left as MemberExpression;
                        MemberExpression rightArgumentExpression = binaryExpression.Right as MemberExpression;

                        if (leftArgumentExpression == null || rightArgumentExpression == null)
                            throw new InvalidOperationException("Can only map to member expressions");

                        output.GetType().GetProperty(leftArgumentExpression.Member.Name).SetValue(
                            output, input.GetType().GetProperty(rightArgumentExpression.Member.Name).GetValue(input, null), null);
                    }
                    break;
                default:
                    throw new InvalidOperationException("Expression type not supported");
            }
        }
    }
}

which can be used in the following way:

class SourceType
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public int Number { get; set; }
}

class DestinationType
{
    public string CustName { get; set; }

    public int Age { get; set; }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var source = new SourceType()
        {
            Name = "Test",
            Number = 22
        };

        var destination = new DestinationType();

        source.MapTo(destination, (src, dst) => dst.CustName == src.Name && dst.Age == src.Number);

        bool assert = source.Name == destination.CustName && source.Number == destination.Age;
    }
}

The advantage of this approach is that this allows you to define your own mapping 'language' which you can make as complex/extensive as you want.

Still I recommend you to use a pre-built solution like AutoFaq or AutoMapper. Good luck

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. My problem was assuming the types match so that I only have to specify the properties once. This is interesting though. I am not very familiar with expressions but I posted what seems like a solution and would appreciate your thoughts on it if you have a chance. –  Benjamin Mar 28 '12 at 17:39

ok, I think I have something working using an Expression and Reflection.

thing1.MapTo(thing2, x => new { x.Prop1, x.Prop2 });

and

public static void MapTo<T, P>(
    this T source, T target, Expression<Func<T, P>> expr)
{
    (expr.Body as NewExpression).Members.ToList()
        .ForEach(m => source.Copy(target, m.Name));
}

public static void Copy<T>(this T source, T target, string prop)
{
    var p = typeof(T).GetProperty(prop);
    p.SetValue(target, p.GetValue(source, null), null);
}

I'm not sure the methods have the best names but it's a start and it allows the usage I was hoping for. Any problems with this approach?

share|improve this answer
    
I would highly recommend additional error handling Copy<T> var p could be null, SetMethod could be null or private, since these methods could also be used for non-anonymous types. –  Erik Philips Mar 28 '12 at 19:00

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