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For example, I need to malloc two pieces of memory, so:

void *a = malloc (1);

if (!a)
  return -1;

void *b = malloc (1);

if (!b)
{
  free (a);
  return -1;
}

Notice if the second malloc fails, I have to free "a" first. The problem is, this can be very messy if there are many such malloc's and error checking's, unless I use the notorious "goto" clause and carefully arrange the order of free's along with the labels:

void *a = malloc (1);

if (!a)
  goto X;

void *b = malloc (1);

if (!b)
  goto Y;

return 0; //normal exit

Y:
  free (a);
X:
  return -1;

Do you have any better solution to this situation? Thanks in advance.

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+1 once i have also faced same problem but completed work with "messy code"..!! –  Mr.32 Mar 28 '12 at 10:04

7 Answers 7

up vote 18 down vote accepted

We do like this:

void *a = NULL;
void *b = NULL;
void *c = NULL;
a = malloc(1);
if (!a) goto errorExit;
b = malloc(1);
if (!b) goto errorExit;
c = malloc(1);
if (!b) goto errorExit;

return 0;
errorExit:
//free a null pointer is safe.
free(a);
free(b);
free(c);
return -1;
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4  
+1 for pointing out that free accepts null pointers. I had no idea this was the case. –  Leo Mar 28 '12 at 9:53
    
Even if it didn't (or if you need to free some other resources where the corresponding cleanup function doesn't do that), you could always do if (a) free(a); and so on. –  Ilmari Karonen Mar 28 '12 at 11:37

Using goto is not a bad thing, in my opinion. Using it for resource cleanup is just right for it.

Source code as famous as the Linux kernel uses the technique.

Just don't use goto to go backwards. That leads to disaster and confusion. Only jump forward is my recommendation.

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4  
Not only Linux kernel does this, but FreeBSD too. Fully agree that it's normal practice. –  arrowdodger Mar 28 '12 at 6:47
    
I did exactly the same long time ago when still using pure C. Now (using C++) I use smart pointers. –  Patrick Mar 28 '12 at 9:28
1  
Also; isn't free(NULL) a no-op? Meaning that there is no problem in just freeing everything? –  Alxandr Mar 28 '12 at 10:00

As previously mentioned by Zan Lynx use goto statement.

You can also alloc larger chunk of memory for further use.

Or you can invest your time to develop something like memory pool.

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Or do this.

 void *a,*b;
 char * p = malloc(2);
 if (!p) return -1;
 a = p;
 b = p+1;
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I think OOP techniques could give you a nice and clean solution to this problem:

typedef struct {
    void *a;
    void *b;
} MyObj;

void delete_MyObj(MyObj* obj)
{
    if (obj) {
        if (obj->a)
            free(obj->a);
        if (obj->b)
            free(obj->b);
        free(obj);
    }
}

MyObj* new_MyObj()
{
    MyObj* obj = (MyObj*)malloc(sizeof(MyObj));
    if (!obj) return NULL;
    memset(obj, 0, sizeof(MyObj));

    obj->a = malloc(1);
    obj->b = malloc(1);

    if (!obj->a || !obj->b) {
        delete_MyObj(obj);
        return 0;
    }

    return obj;
}

int main()
{
    MyObj* obj = new_MyObj();
    if (obj) {
        /* use obj */
        delete_MyObj(obj);
    }
}
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What if you need multiple objects? Then you're back where you started. –  Austin Mar 30 '12 at 5:29

There's nothing really wrong with your goto code IMO (I'd use more verbose labels).

In this case though, the goto statements you've written create exactly the same structure as reversing the ifs.

That is, a conditional forward goto that doesn't leave any scope does exactly the same as an if statement with no else. The difference is that the goto happens not to leave scope, whereas the if is constrained not to leave scope. That's why the if is usually easier to read: the reader has more clues up front.

void *a = malloc (1);
if (a) {
    void *b = malloc (1);
    if (b) {
        return 0; //normal exit
    }
    free(a);
}
return -1;

For a couple of levels this is OK, although taken too far you get "arrow code" with too many levels of indentation. That becomes unreadable for entirely different reasons.

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Use a garbage collector like boehmgc.

It works, it's easy to use, there is no slowdown contrary to common opinion.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boehm_garbage_collector

http://www.hpl.hp.com/personal/Hans_Boehm/gc/

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