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In a swing GUI application, where MVC pattern is applied, how can we use Spring to wire the model view and controller? i.e. what beans (model, view or controller) should be injected using spring and what should be created from the application? I have applied the MVC pattern described here when developing the application. Thanks in advance.

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See also Introduction to Spring using Swing. –  trashgod Mar 28 '12 at 6:13
    
@trashgod, thanks for the link, but this is not what I'm searching for. Introduction to Spring using Swing article provides information on how to wire beans in swing componants' models like table model... What I need to understand is how to apply DI in a more seperated MVC, where models are domain objects and the controllers perform business logic. –  Dilini Rajapaksha Mar 28 '12 at 6:21
    
first of all what version of spring are you allowed to use? such information helps since there are differences in how you write your mvc application depending to these. –  Bogdan Emil Mariesan Mar 30 '12 at 7:07
    
I'm using Spring 3.0 –  Dilini Rajapaksha Mar 30 '12 at 9:41

5 Answers 5

If you have some leeway in the technologies you're using, I'd say you switch to (Griffon)[http://griffon.codehaus.org/]. It uses spring in the background and you also get the power of groovy and Swing UI builders. Best part is, you can still reuse the java code you've written so far. Also, you don't need to worry about DI and stuff. Griffon handles it for you.

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On one of my projects, I successfully used Spring Rich Client.

If you are starting from scratch, I suggest that you take a look at it, it worth it. And it also provides some services out of the box (like authentication box and so).

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I suggest that you can use "spring mvc".

Jsp(View) controller how to show the data;

Controller controll the return the view required data;

Server controller the system logic;

Model is the database model.

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This is a desktop application, spring MVC can be used only in web applications. –  Dilini Rajapaksha Apr 3 '12 at 6:01

It would come to noone's surprise that I'd recommend you to have a look at Griffon. The MVC pattern is deeply engrained in Griffon's DNA, have a look at this sample app as shown in the Griffon Guide

http://griffon.codehaus.org/guide/0.9.5-rc2/guide/2.%20Getting%20Started.html#2.3%20A%20Groovy%20Console%20Example

Griffon provides basic DI capabilities for each MVC member, you only need to define properties following a naming convention. Services, where you would usually put most of the application's logic, are also automatically injected into controllers, as the guide explains in

http://griffon.codehaus.org/guide/0.9.5-rc2/guide/8.%20Controllers%20and%20Services.html#8.2%20Services

However you can make use of Spring DI too via the Spring plugin

http://artifacts.griffon-framework.org/plugin/spring

Spring beans may be defined using the standard XML approach, annotations or the Groovy Spring DSL.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I defined all the beans in spring and used a factory method to create the views when required. Controller is injected to the view and the model and view are added to the controller via spring.

Following are the code samples from a simple example that I came up with, in order to find a solution: (sorry for the long post!)

the application context file:

<bean id="firstModel" class="com.model.FirstModel"></bean>
<bean id="secondModel" class="com.model.SecondModel"></bean>

<bean id="firstController" class="com.controller.FirstController" />
<bean
    class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.MethodInvokingFactoryBean">
    <property name="targetObject">
        <ref local="firstController" />
    </property>
    <property name="targetMethod">
        <value>addModel</value>
    </property>
    <property name="arguments">
        <list>
            <value>FIRST</value>
            <ref local="firstModel" />
        </list>
    </property>
</bean>
<bean id="secondController" class="com.controller.SecondController" />
<bean
    class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.MethodInvokingFactoryBean">
    <property name="targetObject">
        <ref local="secondController" />
    </property>
    <property name="targetMethod">
        <value>addModel</value>
    </property>
    <property name="arguments">
        <list>
            <value>SECOND</value>
            <ref local="secondModel" />
        </list>
    </property>
</bean>
<bean
    class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.MethodInvokingFactoryBean">
    <property name="targetObject">
        <ref local="secondController" />
    </property>
    <property name="targetMethod">
        <value>addModel</value>
    </property>
    <property name="arguments">
        <list>
            <value>FIRST</value>
            <ref local="firstModel" />
        </list>
    </property>
</bean>
<bean id="firstForm" class="com.view.FirstForm">
    <property name="controller">
        <ref bean="firstController" />
    </property>
</bean>
<bean id="secondForm" class="com.view.SecondForm">
    <property name="controller">
        <ref bean="secondController" />
    </property>
</bean>

following is the abstract controller class:

public class AbstractController implements PropertyChangeListener {

Map<Type, BaseView> registeredViews;
Map<Type, AbstractModel> registeredModels;

public AbstractController() {
    registeredViews = new HashMap<Type, BaseView>();
    registeredModels = new HashMap<Type, AbstractModel>();
}

public void addModel(Type type, AbstractModel model) {
    registeredModels.put(type, model);
    model.addPropertyChangeListener(this);
}

public void removeModel(AbstractModel model) {
    registeredModels.remove(model);
    model.removePropertyChangeListener(this);
}

public void addView(BaseView view, Type type) {
    registeredViews.put(type, view);
}

public void removeView(javax.swing.JFrame view) {
    registeredViews.remove(view);
}

public void propertyChange(PropertyChangeEvent evt) {

    for (BaseView view : registeredViews.values()) {
        view.modelPropertyChange(evt);
    }
}

protected void setModelProperty(String propertyName, Object newValue) {
    for (AbstractModel model : registeredModels.values()) {
        Statement statment = new Statement(model, "set" + propertyName, new Object[] { newValue });
        try {
            statment.execute();
        } catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
            continue;
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

    }
}    
}

following is the abstract model class:

public class AbstractModel {

protected PropertyChangeSupport propertyChangeSupport;

public AbstractModel() {
    propertyChangeSupport = new PropertyChangeSupport(this);
}

public void addPropertyChangeListener(PropertyChangeListener listener) {
    propertyChangeSupport.addPropertyChangeListener(listener);
}

public void removePropertyChangeListener(PropertyChangeListener listener) {
    propertyChangeSupport.removePropertyChangeListener(listener);
}

protected void firePropertyChange(String propertyName, Object oldValue, Object newValue) {
    propertyChangeSupport.firePropertyChange(propertyName, oldValue, newValue);
}    
}

Following is the code sample of the view interface:

public interface BaseView {

void modelPropertyChange(PropertyChangeEvent evt);

public abstract void showForm();

}

following is the code sample of the factory class:

public class FormFactory {

private ApplicationContext context;
private static FormFactory viewFactory;

private FormFactory() {
    if (context == null) {
        context = new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext("ApplicationContext.xml");
    }
}

public static synchronized FormFactory getInstance() {
    if (viewFactory == null) {
        viewFactory = new FormFactory();
    }
    return viewFactory;

}

public BaseView createForm(Type type) {
    BaseView form = null;
    switch (type) {
        case FIRST:
            form = (BaseView) context.getBean("firstForm");
            break;
        case SECOND:
            form  = (BaseView) context.getBean("secondForm");
            break;
        default:
            break;
    }
    return form;

}
}
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