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I have the following two very similar statements with a subquery. I highlighted the difference with **.

1:

SELECT DISTINCT name
FROM person, nameindex n
WHERE person.id1    ='0812'
AND person.id2    =n.id2
AND person.id1    =n.id1
AND n.phonetic IN
  (SELECT n2.phonetic
  FROM nameindex n2
  WHERE n2.id1=person.id1 **
  GROUP BY n2.phonetic
 HAVING COUNT(*) BETWEEN 4 AND 500)

2:

SELECT DISTINCT name
FROM person, nameindex n
WHERE person.id1    ='0812'
AND person.id2    =n.id2
AND person.id1    =n.id1
AND n.phonetic IN
  (SELECT n2.phonetic
  FROM nameindex n2
  WHERE n2.id1='0812'  **
  GROUP BY n2.phonetic
 HAVING COUNT(*) BETWEEN 4 AND 500)

I would think oracle could infer, that person.id1 must be constant 0812 in the subquery. However, both queries produce extremely different execution plans and costs (1: cost 4404211855 while 2: cost: 36237). Why is this?

This is more an analytical query, not an OLTP one, so there are no indices defined for this specific query.

(Background of the query: Get names of persons within id1='0812' who have a phonetic entry in the nameindex table for which there are between 4 and 500 occurrences.)

share|improve this question
    
You are missing a WHERE in both versions. –  Martin Smith Mar 28 '12 at 6:53
    
Thanks, fixed it –  stracktracer Mar 28 '12 at 6:58
    
In SQL Server the predicate on 0812 gets pushed down to n2 for both versions of the query and the plans are identical so yes Oracle could infer this but I presume doesn't from your question. –  Martin Smith Mar 28 '12 at 7:01
    
can you give us the type for Person.id1 and nameindex.id1 ? Numbers? varchars? –  Florin Ghita Mar 28 '12 at 7:53
    
ID1 is Varchar2(8) and ID2 is NUMBER(20,0) –  stracktracer Mar 28 '12 at 7:54
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I've run a similar query with the following setup:

CREATE TABLE person (id1, id2, NAME) AS 
   SELECT to_char(mod(ROWNUM, 1000), 'fm0000'), ROWNUM,
          dbms_random.string('A',10)
     FROM dual 
   CONNECT BY LEVEL <= 1e6;
CREATE TABLE nameindex (id1, id2, phonetic) AS
   SELECT id1, id2, to_char(dbms_random.value(1, 200), 'fm000')
     FROM person;

I've found that your first query produces the following plan:

PLAN_TABLE_OUTPUT
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 291343677
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation             | Name      | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT      |           |     1 |  2040 |   331K  (2)| 01:06:2
|   1 |  HASH UNIQUE          |           |     1 |  2040 |   331K  (2)| 01:06:2
|*  2 |   FILTER              |           |       |       |            |
|*  3 |    HASH JOIN          |           |   891 |  1775K|  1750   (2)| 00:00:2
|*  4 |     TABLE ACCESS FULL | NAMEINDEX |   892 | 18732 |   739   (2)| 00:00:0
|*  5 |     TABLE ACCESS FULL | PERSON    |  1395 |  2750K|  1010   (2)| 00:00:1
|*  6 |    FILTER             |           |       |       |            |
|   7 |     HASH GROUP BY     |           |  9550 | 76400 |   740   (2)| 00:00:0
|*  8 |      TABLE ACCESS FULL| NAMEINDEX |  9550 | 76400 |   739   (2)| 00:00:0
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   2 - filter( EXISTS (SELECT 0 FROM "NAMEINDEX" "N2" WHERE "N2"."ID1"=:B1
              GROUP BY "N2"."PHONETIC" HAVING "N2"."PHONETIC"=:B2 AND COUNT(*)>=
              COUNT(*)<=500))
   3 - access("PERSON"."ID2"="N"."ID2" AND "PERSON"."ID1"="N"."ID1")
   4 - filter("N"."ID1"='0812')
   5 - filter("PERSON"."ID1"='0812')
   6 - filter("N2"."PHONETIC"=:B1 AND COUNT(*)>=4 AND COUNT(*)<=500)
   8 - filter("N2"."ID1"=:B1)

As you can see the IN semi-join is rewritten as an EXISTS which produces the same plan as this query:

SELECT DISTINCT NAME
  FROM person, nameindex n
 WHERE person.id1 = '0812'
   AND person.id2 = n.id2
   AND person.id1 = n.id1
   AND EXISTS (SELECT NULL
                 FROM nameindex n2
                WHERE n2.id1 = person.id1
                  AND n2.phonetic = n.phonetic
                GROUP BY n2.phonetic
               HAVING COUNT(*) BETWEEN 4 AND 500);

Here you see that the subquery is NOT constant and is therefore computed for each row of the main query, leading to a less than optimal execution plan.

I suggest you use all the join columns in the GROUP BY when you use an aggregated semi-join. The following query produces the optimal plan:

SELECT DISTINCT NAME
  FROM person, nameindex n
 WHERE person.id1 = '0812'
   AND person.id2 = n.id2
   AND person.id1 = n.id1
   AND (n.id1, n.phonetic) IN (SELECT n2.id1, n2.phonetic
                                 FROM nameindex n2
                                GROUP BY n2.id1, n2.phonetic
                               HAVING COUNT(*) BETWEEN 4 AND 500);
share|improve this answer
    
Indeed this works well, and uses only one parameter. It seems Oracle's optimizer is not that smart than I thought. –  stracktracer Mar 28 '12 at 12:41
    
Human intervention is still needed in some special corner-cases, honestly I don't see this as a bad thing :) –  Vincent Malgrat Mar 28 '12 at 13:54
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