Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a hopefully simple MySQL query question which is eluding me at late at night. I'm trying to do a SELECT which counts the number of instances of a set of data (orders) and groups those instances by a value which exists in a parent a couple levels above the order itself.

For example:

CREATE TABLE  `so_test`.`categories` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL auto_increment,
  PRIMARY KEY  (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=572395 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

CREATE TABLE  `so_test`.`product_group` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `category_id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL auto_increment,
  PRIMARY KEY  (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=572395 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

CREATE TABLE  `so_test`.`products` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `product_group_id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL auto_increment,
  PRIMARY KEY  (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=572395 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

CREATE TABLE  `so_test`.`orders` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `product_id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `customer_id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL auto_increment,
  PRIMARY KEY  (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=572395 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

What I'm looking to do is something in the neighborhood of:

SELECT count(orders.id), categoryId FROM orders, categories WHERE orders.customer_id in (1,2,3) GROUP BY orders.productId.productGroupId.categoryId

Assuming there are 17 orders for products in category 1, 2 orders for products in category 2, and 214 orders for category 3, what I'm hoping to get back is:

count(orders.id), categoryId
============================
      17              1
      2               2
      214             3

If I was trying to group by say product_id I'd be fine..but the two-levels-up portion is throwing me.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just join them together:

select categoryid, count(orders.id)
from category c
left join product_group pg on pg.category_id = c.id
left join products on p on p.product_group_id = pg.id
left join orders o on o.product_id = p.id

For categories without an order, count(orders.id) will return 0, while count(*) would return one or more, depending on the number of productgroups and products.

An inner join would not count categories without orders at all.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed - thanks! –  DarkSquid Jun 13 '09 at 18:56
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.