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I have this class :

public class TempFileRef
    {
        public readonly string FilePath;

        public TempFileRef(string filePath)
        {
            FilePath = filePath;
        }

        ~TempFileRef()
        {
            File.Delete(FilePath);    //<== what happens if exception ?
        }
    }

Question :

What happens if there is an Exception in the destructor ?

1) will it break the other finalization's in the F-Queue ?

2) I i'll wrap it with Try and Cache - I will NEVER know that there was an error

3) what should I do here ?

edit

The MSDN pattern for it based on "if I **forget** to call the Dispose method - so the GC will do it eventually.... it is better later then never...". So my question is specially about exception in the Finilize ( destructor)

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2  
I would call it "Finalize method", not "Destructor", although it uses destructor syntax. –  Uwe Keim Mar 28 '12 at 7:34
2  
@UweKeim - the C# reference calls them destructors. –  Henk Holterman Mar 28 '12 at 8:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

From MSDN :

Exceptions that occur during destructor execution are worth special mention. If an exception occurs during destructor execution, and that exception is not caught, then the execution of that destructor is terminated and the destructor of the base class (if any) is called. If there is no base class (as in the case of the object type) or if there is no base class destructor, then the exception is discarded.

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This actually depends on the .NET framework

For example in .NET 4, you application will be terminated (link)

If Finalize or an override of Finalize throws an exception, and the runtime is not hosted by an application that overrides the default policy, the runtime terminates the process and no active try-finally blocks or finalizers are executed. This behavior ensures process integrity if the finalizer cannot free or destroy resources.

In contrast in .NET 1, only that finilizer will be terminated and your application will continue running (link)

If Finalize or an override of Finalize throws an exception, the runtime ignores the exception, terminates that Finalize method, and continues the finalization process.

What you actually trying to do is to implement an IDisposable pattern, so instead leaving this work to a finilazer, do it in the progrmatically called Dispose.

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please see my edit. there might be a situation in which i forget to call dispose. –  Royi Namir Mar 28 '12 at 7:43
    
@RoyiNamir Regarding your edit, please see the first part of the answer. CLR behaviour depends on the .NET framework version and any overrides to the execution policy –  oleksii Mar 28 '12 at 7:46

Instead of deleting a file in finalizer consider implementing IDisposable interface.

Exceptions that occur during destructor execution are worth special mention. If an exception occurs during destructor execution, and that exception is not caught, then the execution of that destructor is terminated and the destructor of the base class (if any) is called. If there is no base class (as in the case of the object type) or if there is no base class destructor, then the exception is discarded.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa664609%28v=vs.71%29.aspx

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The MSDN pattern for it based on " if I forget to call the Dispose method - so the GC will do it eventually.... it is better later then never...". So my question is specially about the Finilize ( destructor). - please see my edit. –  Royi Namir Mar 28 '12 at 7:39
    
@RoyiNamir, surely the answer then is to not forget. –  Ash Burlaczenko Mar 28 '12 at 7:48

Do not use Destructor, it's not C++, use a Dispose() method of IDisposbale interface that you should implement. Call Dispose() esplicitly from your code, or use your class with using , like (say)

using(var tempRef = new TempFileRef())
{
    //do something here

} //Dispose will be called after this line.

EDIT

According to the documentation

If Finalize or an override of Finalize throws an exception, and the runtime is not hosted by an application that overrides the default policy, the runtime terminates the process and no active try-finally blocks or finalizers are executed. This behavior ensures process integrity if the finalizer cannot free or destroy resources.

In other words: do not call something in Finalizer that can possibly fail. Use Dispose, instead, and ensure it was called.

Hope this helps.

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see my edit. I now why im asking it. –  Royi Namir Mar 28 '12 at 7:40
    
@RoyiNamir: see my edited post. –  Tigran Mar 28 '12 at 7:45
1  
@downvoter: what is wrong with this post. Is it different from the most voted annswer here? –  Tigran Mar 28 '12 at 8:22

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