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Wanted to understand the difference between undef and define a macro as 0. Thanks.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted
#define MACRO 0

defines the preprocessor token MACRO to be the literal 0

#undef MACRO

Removes the definition of the preprocessor token MACRO so that it's as if it never existed.

For example:

#define MACRO 0

#if defined ( MACRO )
// we get here
#endif

#if ( MACRO )
// we don't get here
#endif

#undef MACRO

#if defined ( MACRO )
// we don't get here
#endif
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2  
For another example, #define MACRO 1 immediately after #undef MACRO is OK, whereas #define MACRO 1 immediately after #define MACRO 0 is not OK. –  Steve Jessop Mar 28 '12 at 8:25

One of them defines a macro in such a way that in certain contexts, occurrences of the macro identifier will be replaced with 0 by the preprocessor. The other removes any definition of a macro such that if the identifier is found in the same contexts, it is not replaced with anything by the preprocessor, it is instead left as is.

For example, the preprocessor turns this:

#define MACRO 0

int main()
{
    return MACRO;
}

into this:

int main()
{
    return 0;
}

But, it will turn this:

#define MACRO 0
#undef MACRO

int main()
{
    return MACRO;
}

into this:

int main()
{
    return MACRO;
} 

In the second example, the C compiler will encounter the identifer MACRO and probably throw an error that it is undeclared, and the compilation will likely fail.

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in the first case the symbol will not be defined(#ifdef MACRO will not 'enter'), in the second case you have MACRO defined as '0'

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A macro defined as 0 is still defined.

#define VAL 0
#ifdef VAL
  // VAL is defined so this part will be entered
  printf("%d", VAL); // <- prints "0"
#endif

#undef VAL
#ifdef VAL
  // Val is now undefined, this part will not be entered
#endif
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The difference is that "undefined" isn't the same as "0" (depending on your usage).

Used in a boolean context, e.g. #if MY_MACRO, there is no difference (because undefined translated to false).

However, once you check for some macro to be defined, there's a difference:

// this macro is defined but empty.
// #ifdef MY_MACRO would evaluate to true/be included
// #if MY_MACRO would evaluate to false/not be included
// occurances would be deleted, e.g. 'something = MY_MACRO;' would be changed to 'something = ;'
#define MY_MACRO

// this macro is defined and set to 0.
// #ifdef MY_MACRO would evaluate to true/be included
// #if MY_MACRO would evaluate to false/not be included
// occurances would be replaced, e.g. 'something = MY_MACRO;' would be changed to 'something = 0;'
#define MY_MACRO 0

// this macro is undefined (after these lines)
// #ifdef MY_MACRO would evaluate to false/not be included
// #if MY_MACRO would evaluate to false/not be included
// occurances would remain unchanged (as the macro isn't defined anymore), e.g. 'something = MY_MACRO;' would be kept as 'something = MY_MACRO;'
#define MY_MACRO Hello!
#undef MY_MACRO

In general: #define always assigns some value and makes the macro being defined; even if the new value is "empty". #undef will always remove the macro definition making it undefined; occurances will no longer be replaced.

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