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I read that:

Object sync = new Object();

/* inter to monitor */
try {
    sync.wait();
} catch (InterruptedException ex) {

} finally {

}

/* our code*/
/* exit from monotir */
sync.notify();

is like

synchronize (sync) {
    /* our code*/
}

enter code here

Does it true?

I try this in my code and it doesn't work.

private Object data;
    private Object sync = new Object();

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SimpleProducerConsumer pc = new SimpleProducerConsumer();
        new Thread(pc.new Producer()).start();
        new Thread(pc.new Consumer()).start();
    }

    public Object pop() {
        try {
            sync.wait();
        } catch (InterruptedException e1) {
            e1.printStackTrace();
        }
        System.out.println("Before");
        Object d = data;
        data = null;
        try {
            Thread.sleep(100);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        System.out.println("pop");
        System.out.println("After");
        sync.notify();
        return d;
    }

    public void push(Object d) {
        try {
            sync.wait();
        } catch (InterruptedException e1) {
            e1.printStackTrace();
        }
        try {
            Thread.sleep(10);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        data = d;
        System.out.println("push");
        sync.notify();
    }

    class Producer implements Runnable {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            while (true) {
                push(new Object());
            }
        }
    }

    class Consumer implements Runnable {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            while (true) {
                pop();
            }
        }
    }

What is wrong with my code?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, sync.wait() and sync.notify() are far from synonyms to sychronize (sync) { ... and ... }.

In fact, in order to call wait you have to be in a synchronized block.

I'll explain the concepts of synchronize, wait and notify and the difference will be clear.

  • When a thread enters a synchronized (sync) { ... } block it grabs the lock of the sync monitor (meaning that the lock is taken and that no other thread can enter the block at that point).

  • When a thread calls sync.wait() it temporarily releases the lock of sync. (It's waiting for something to happen. Something that requires the lock to be able to happen.)

  • A thread calls sync.notify() to notify other threads that something has happened, at which point they resume execution.

What is wrong with my code?

I assume you for instance want to make sure that if two threads try to pop something they should avoid doing the following:

Thread 1              Thread 2
--------------------------------------
Object d = data;
                      Object d = data;
                      data = null;
data = null;
return d;
                      return d;

To avoid this you need to make sure that d = data and data = null happens atomically.

This can be achieved by doing

Object d;
synchronized (sync) {
    d = data;
    data = null;
}

(Now the first and second statement in Thread 1 above can't be split up.)

Furthermore you seem to want pop to be blocking, i.e. if d == null it should wait for some other thread to push something.

This can be achieved by doing

synchronized (sync) {
    while (d == null)
        sync.wait();
}

and do sync.notify() in push (again within a synchronized block covering everything that needs to be done atomically in the push method).

Related question / further reading:

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You have both your push() and pop() methods waiting on the same lock object for a notify(), but there's no one that calls notify() or notifyAll() on that object, so they're waiting indefinitely. What happens here is:

  1. the Producer waits on the sync.wait() call inside push() for someone to call sync.notify()
  2. the Consumer waits on the sync.wait() call inside pop() for someone to call sync.notify()
  3. deadlock
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No, they're completely different. You call wait() from inside a synchronized block, if you want to suspend execution until some condition is met. You use notify() or notifyAll() on the same object, (again in a synchronized block) once that condition is met.

So in this circumstance, two threads can actually be in synchronized blocks on the same object at the same time; this is allowed when one of them has done a wait(). The first thread starts up again once the second thread exits the synchronized block in which it called notify().

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