Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I can pin some programs to taskbar on Win7 using PowerShell.

$shell = new-object -com "Shell.Application"  
$folder = $shell.Namespace('C:\Windows')    
$item = $folder.Parsename('notepad.exe')
$verb = $item.Verbs() | ? {$_.Name -eq 'Pin to Tas&kbar'}
if ($verb) {$verb.DoIt()}

How do I modify the above code to pin a program to the Start menu?

share|improve this question
    
Don't. This is the user's decision, not yours. Same with the taskbar, actually. There is no programmatic access to this on purpose. –  Joey Mar 28 '12 at 8:35
    
Why? Is it prejudicial? Moreover I tried it for start menu. But it does not work. –  cethint Mar 28 '12 at 8:48
    
    
I have to do it. Because, I want to create a standard developer machine. All machines must be same. Taskbars, start menus... When developers changed their machines, they mustn't have any concord problem in the future –  cethint Mar 28 '12 at 8:53
1  
There are ways to do so in Windows images you roll out. IIRC via the System Image Manager and answer files for unattended installation. –  Joey Mar 28 '12 at 8:57

5 Answers 5

Use the code below

$shell = new-object -com "Shell.Application"  
$folder = $shell.Namespace('C:\Windows')    
$item = $folder.Parsename('notepad.exe')
$verb = $item.Verbs() | ? {$_.Name -eq 'Pin to Start Men&u'}
if ($verb) {$verb.DoIt()}

Note: the change is in the fourth line.

share|improve this answer

See the script (international) here : http://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/scriptcenter/b66434f1-4b3f-4a94-8dc3-e406eb30b750

If you want to add an action like Pin to Modern UI interface (Windows 8), at $verbs, add 51201

share|improve this answer
    
Rather than just providing a link, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and just provide the link for additional reference. If you're not up to this task, you should consider simply leaving a comment on the question instead of posting an answer. –  Dukeling Feb 22 '14 at 4:53

Another way

$sa = new-object -c shell.application
$pn = $sa.namespace($env:windir).parsename('notepad.exe')
$pn.invokeverb('startpin')

Or unpin

$pn.invokeverb('startunpin')
share|improve this answer
    
This is by far the best answer I've seen. –  Wade Hatler Mar 4 '14 at 3:35
    
How do you set the name you'd like displayed? –  rsmith84 Mar 5 at 2:23

The main problem with most of the solution is that they enumerate the verbs on a file, search for the string to perform the action (“Pin to Startmenu” etc.) and then execute it. This does not work if you need to support 30+ languages in your company, except you use external function to search for the localized command (see answer from shtako-verflow).

The answer from Steven Penny is the first that is language neutral and does not need any external code. It uses the verbs stored in the registry HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CLSID\{90AA3A4E-1CBA-4233-B8BB-535773D48449} and HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CLSID\{a2a9545d-a0c2-42b4-9708-a0b2badd77c8}

Based on this, here’s the code we are now using:

function PinToTaskbar {
         param([Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][string]$FilePath)  
  ExecuteVerb $FilePath "taskbarpin" 
}

function UnpinFromTaskbar {
         param([Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][string]$FilePath)  
  ExecuteVerb $FilePath "taskbarunpin" 
}

function PinToStartmenu {
         param([Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][string]$FilePath)  
 ExecuteVerb $FilePath "startpin" 
}

function UnpinFromStartmenu {
         param([Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][string]$FilePath)  
 ExecuteVerb $FilePath "startunpin" 
}

function ExecuteVerb {  
         param(
            [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][string]$File,
            [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][string]$Verb
         ) 

    $path = [System.Environment]::ExpandEnvironmentVariables($File) 
    $basePath = split-path $path -parent   #retrieve only the path File=C:\Windows\notepad.exe -> C:\Windows
    $targetFile = split-path $path -leaf    #retrieve only the file File=C:\Windows\notepad.exe -> notepad.exe

    $shell = new-object -com "Shell.Application"  
    $folder = $shell.Namespace($basePath)        
    if ($folder)
    {
       $item = $folder.Parsename($targetFile) 

       if ($item)
       {
         $item.invokeverb($Verb)
         # "This method does not return a value." (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/bb787816%28v=vs.85%29.aspx)
         # Therefore we have no chance to know if this was successful...
         write-host "Method [$Verb] executed for [$path]"       
       } 
       else
       {
         write-host "Target file [$targetFile] not found, aborting" 
       }             
    }
    else 
    {      
      write-host "Folder [$basePath] not found, aborting" 
    }

}


#PinToTaskbar "%WINDIR%\notepad.exe"
#UnpinFromTaskbar "%WINDIR%\notepad.exe"

PinToStartmenu "%WINDIR%\notepad.exe"
#UnpinFromStartmenu "%WINDIR%\notepad.exe"
share|improve this answer

Steven Penny's second answer above worked well for me. Here are a couple more tidbits.

It's doing COM through PowerShell, so you can do the same thing with pretty much any COM client. For example, here's an AutoHotkey version.

Shell := ComObjCreate("Shell.Application")
Target := Shell.Namespace(EnvGet("WinDir")).ParseName("Notepad.exe")
Target.InvokeVerb("startpin")

VBScript or InnoSetup would look almost the same except for the function used to create the object.

I also found that I have one program that pinned OK, but didn't have the right icon and/or description because of limitations in the compiler. I just made a little 1-line WinForms app that starts the target with Process.Start, and then added the appropriate icon, and the name I wanted in the Start Menu in the Title property in AppInfo.cs.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.