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how do I convert a reference to a pointer correctly?

The code below gives me the following warning: "taking address of temporary".

MyClass myclass;

vector<MyClass*> myClassList;

myClassList.push_back(&myclass);

MethodThatsNeedsVectorOFMyClassPointers(myClassList);
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1  
Hmm, no, his code does not give that warning. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 28 '12 at 8:58
    
Why do you need to store a pointer rather than just using references? –  Matt Mar 28 '12 at 8:58
1  
this code looks ok to me unless you try to use vector after myClass is destroyed.. –  Naveen Mar 28 '12 at 8:59
1  
@Mat you can't make vectors of references. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 28 '12 at 9:01
1  
There is no temporary. You may see such a warning, but the lines of code you showed us are not responsible for that. –  sellibitze Mar 28 '12 at 9:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The way your code looks like now, you shouldn't get a warning since myclass and myClassList have the same lifetime. However, if myClassList outlives myclass, you need to dynamically allocate MyClass:

vector<MyClass*> myClassList;
{
    MyClass* myclass = new MyClass; 
    myClassList.push_back(myclass);
}

If the following is closer to what you actually have:

vector<MyClass*> myClassList;
{
   MyClass myclass;
   myClassList.push_back(&myclass);
}

then myclass is destroyed at the closing }, and myClassList will contain a pointer to released memory.

Also, is MyClass polymorphic? Do you really need to store pointers in the vector?

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2  
The vector in the code lives as long as myclass. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 28 '12 at 9:00
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes since he's getting the warning, I'm guessing that's not his actual code - see MethodThatsNeedsVectorOFMyClassPointers. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 28 '12 at 9:01
    
You guessing that "the way [the OP has] it now" the warning is correct? Fine that explains the warning. But you're also guessing that he actually needs dynamic allocation and not just vector<MyClass> or some other alternative. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 28 '12 at 9:30
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes I rephrased. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 28 '12 at 9:35
    
Of course, if dynamic allocation is really necessary, it would be strongly advisable to use an std::vector<std::unique_ptr<MyClass>>, not an std::vector<MyClass*>. –  leftaroundabout Mar 28 '12 at 9:41

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