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From the following command how can i eliminate all the lines that occur before

 Owner     RepoName             CreatedDate

EDIT Command:

find /opt/site/ -name '.log.txt' | xargs cat | awk '{$NF=""; print $0}' | sed '1i Owner RepoName CreatedDate' | column -t

The output is

find: Filesystem loop detected; `/nfs/.snapshot/nightly.4' has the same device number and inode as a directory which is 2 levels higher in the filesystem hierarchy.
find: Filesystem loop detected; `/nfs/.snapshot/nightly.5' has the same device number and inode as a directory which is 2 levels higher in the filesystem hierarchy.
find: Filesystem loop detected; `/nfs/.snapshot/nightly.6' has the same device number and inode as a directory which is 2 levels higher in the filesystem hierarchy.
Owner     RepoName             CreatedDate
val        abc                  Fri          Mar  16  17:01:07  PDT
p1         repo_pc              Wed          Mar  21  11:34:42  PDT
New        fm                   Mon          Mar  19  00:15:51  PD 

Required output is only:

Owner     RepoName             CreatedDate
val        abc                  Fri          Mar  16  17:01:07  PDT
p1         repo_pc              Wed          Mar  21  11:34:42  PDT
New        fm                   Mon          Mar  19  00:15:51  PD 
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Those find errors will be on stderr, so bypass your chain entirely, you'll want to redirect the errors with 2>/dev/null, although that will prevent you seeing any other errors in the find command.

find /opt/site/ -name '.log.txt' 2>/dev/null | xargs cat | awk '{$NF=""; print $0}' | xargs sed "/Filesystem/d" | sed '1i Owner RepoName CreatedDate' | column -t

In general with a complicated command like this, you should break it down when you have errors so that you can work out where the problem is coming from.

Let's split up this command to see what it's doing:

find /opt/site/ -name '.log.txt' 2>/dev/null - find all the files under /opt/site/ named .log.txt

xargs cat - get all their contents, one after the other

awk '{$NF=""; print $0}' - delete the last column

xargs sed "/Filesystem/d" - Treat each entry as a file and delete any lines containing Filesystem from the contents of those files.

sed '1i Owner RepoName CreatedDate' - Insert Owner RepoName CreatedDate on the first line

column -t - Convert the given data into a table

I'd suggest building up the command, and checking the output is correct at each stage.

Several things are surprising about your command:

  1. The find one looks for files that are exactly .log.txt rather than an extension.
  2. The second xargs call - converting the contents of the .log.txt files into filenames.
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2>/dev/null still doesnt work......... –  Rajeev Mar 28 '12 at 9:31
    
Ambiguous output redirect. –  Rajeev Mar 28 '12 at 9:33
    
@Rajeev Possibly you are using a shell other than bash? –  Douglas Leeder Mar 28 '12 at 9:38
    
:I used bash the output is still the same.Ambiguous output redirect –  Rajeev Mar 29 '12 at 7:10

You could eliminate the error output from find by appending 2>/dev/null to the find portion of you command, prior to the first pipe. [Edit: this is the best way, and I've voted Douglas' up as he was here first ;) ]

But if you really want to do it with sed or awk (can't think why?), you could amend your awk script to skip lines beginning with 'find:':

awk '/^find:/ {next;} {$NF=""; print $0}' 
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I stillget the same output for what u have suggested –  Rajeev Mar 29 '12 at 7:13

Sadly, you seem to be using csh or tcsh, where redirecting standard error separate from standard output is difficult. Otherwise Douglas's answer would have worked. But try this:

(find /opt/site/ -name '.log.txt' | xargs cat | awk '{$NF=""; print $0}' | sed '1i Owner RepoName CreatedDate' | column -t > output) >&/dev/null

Note the parens surrounding the bulk of the command. Within those parens is a redirect to send standard output to a file called "output" instead of to your terminal (name it whatever you want -- or replace output with /dev/tty if you really want to see it in your terminal). Outside those parens is a redirect to send the remaining error messages to /dev/null.

The whole thing is a miserable commentary on the longevity of terrible shells.

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Next sed command should do the job (use it with an input file or from a pipe):

sed -n '/^Owner/,$ p'

Explanation:

-n             # Disable auto-print.
/^Owner/       # From a line beginning with 'Owner'...
$              # ...until end of input...
p              # print
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