Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need your help. Say I have a code inside a for statement similar to as shown below.

the value of $logCount is massive. Like a million. There are certain hashes that are made in my loop that grows over period of time, and it runs my system out memory!. What I am supposed to do is, run through the loop and then write the results to a file. But since I am running out of memory this never happens. Hence I want to break my loop into steps of 1000.

Can you help? Is there a smarter way to do this? I dont know how to append to the bottom of the file, if I break my loop.

for (my $i=0; $i < $logCount; $i++){    
    # Crap code
    # Herp Derp
    generatePowerRecord($sectorMapper->{'sectors'}, \$powerresult, ,\%Dimensions, \@powers, \@Attn, $sectors, $count-$totalcount);
    generatePhaseRecord($sectorMapper->{'sectors'}, \$phaseresult, ,\%Dimensions);
    generateDelayRecord($sectorMapper->{'sectors'}, \$delayresult, ,\%Dimensions, \@delay_history, \$sectors, $count-$totalcount);
};

$fh->print($dataresult);
$fh->print($powerresult);
$fh->print($phaseresult);
$fh->print($delayresult);
$fh->print("\n}");  
share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by brian d foy, JoseK, Sinan Ünür, Flimzy, daxim Mar 2 at 22:05

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Show the full code. – The append access mode is spelled >>. –  daxim Mar 28 '12 at 9:49
    
Try it with smaller input data and look at what those subroutines are doing. –  brian d foy Mar 28 '12 at 19:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The simplest solution is to throw extra prints into your loop and call them every 1000th iteration, something like this:

for (my $i=0; $i < $logCount; $i++){    
    # Crap code
    # Herp Derp
    generatePowerRecord($sectorMapper->{'sectors'}, \$powerresult, ,\%Dimensions, \@powers, \@Attn, $sectors, $count-$totalcount);
    generatePhaseRecord($sectorMapper->{'sectors'}, \$phaseresult, ,\%Dimensions);
    generateDelayRecord($sectorMapper->{'sectors'}, \$delayresult, ,\%Dimensions, \@delay_history, \$sectors, $count-$totalcount);

    # call this every 1000th iteration
    if($i > 0 and $i % 1000 == 0) {
       $fh->print($dataresult);
       $fh->print($powerresult);
       $fh->print($phaseresult);
       $fh->print($delayresult);

       # cleanup hashes
       undef $dataresult;
       undef $powerresult;
       undef $phaseresult;
       undef $delayresult;
    }
};

The print call will append data to your file until it remains opened.

share|improve this answer
    
I used this. Except that I had to print each of them using different file handles and then later concatenate them all. But it worked. Thanks! –  Fighter2 Mar 30 '12 at 1:09

Use the highly-regarded Devel::NYTProf profiling module.

From the synopsis:

  # profile code and write database to ./nytprof.out
  perl -d:NYTProf some_perl.pl

  # convert database into a set of html files, e.g., ./nytprof/index.html
  # and open a web browser on the nytprof/index.html file
  nytprofhtml --open

  # or into comma separated files, e.g., ./nytprof/*.csv
  nytprofcsv
share|improve this answer
    
WOw. I have never heard of this module. Let me try and learn it. It will defintely be of use to me later. –  Fighter2 Mar 30 '12 at 1:09

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.