Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a lot of pieces of code which has to be run one time during initialization.

I have to use a boolean flag this way because it is in an event

bool _fuse;

void PerformLayout()
{
    Size size;

    if (!_fuse)
    {
        size = _InitialContainerSize;
        _fuse = true;
    }
    else
        size = parent.Size;

    // ...
}

Because it happens often, I did something to make this boolean variable to look like a fuse :

So I did this:

bool _fuse;

void PerformLayout()
{
    Size size;

    if (!Burnt(ref _fuse))
        size = _InitialContainerSize;
    else
        size = parent.Size;

    // ...
}

If it is initialized to false, the result of the query returns false once, make the switch to true, and successive calls return true.

public static bool Burnt(ref bool value)
{
    if (!value)
    {
        value = true;
        return false;
    }
    else
        return true;
}

Of course, it works, but I am only moderately satisfied and I am sure there is more elegant solutions. What would be yours ?

share|improve this question
2  
return value || !(value = true); (just kidding!) –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 28 '12 at 9:36
    
Interesting. So far the tally is three upvotes and three votes to close. –  Martin Liversage Mar 28 '12 at 9:37
    
Not a real question. Should be on a codereview site. Not here. –  leppie Mar 28 '12 at 9:39
    
The best solution was your first implementation. The second hides unnecessarily your intent. Rename that var as _oneTimeSizeInitializeDone and forget –  Steve Mar 28 '12 at 9:39
1  
By the way, I completely understand that you want to avoid this repetition. I think if you just changed the names of the method and the variable to something more understandable this could be a nice pattern (maybe even make it a very small class). –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 28 '12 at 9:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the general thrust in avoiding repetition here is right (even if the repetition is very small … but still). Just encapsulate it and name it properly:

struct InitializerGuard {
    private bool hasRun;

    public bool HasRun() {
        if (hasRun)
            return true;
        hasRun = true;
        return false;
    }
}

Usage:

InitializerGuard sizeInitializer;

void PerformLayout()
{
    Size size;

    if (!sizeInitializer.HasRun())
        size = _InitialContainerSize;
    else
        size = parent.Size;

    // ...
}

But if you find yourself using this pattern very often this might indicate that a refactoring is in order. Maybe just assign default values to some variables? Why aren’t they initialised, anyway?

share|improve this answer
1  
or just: Size size = HasRun() ? parent.Size : _initSize; –  leppie Mar 28 '12 at 10:02
    
This is elegant and CLEAR. I like it. I think I am going to copy this. (maybe I will change the HasRun method to a property instead ?) - I propably could refactor some part of my code better, but in many cases I have not choice because it is used in some events, and code arount requires some init at their first fire. –  Larry Mar 28 '12 at 10:07
1  
@Laurent Properties must not have side-effects. At the very least, this screws up your debugger (if you debug your code and add a watch for this variable, the property is evaluated at arbitrary times, thus changing your behaviour). So if you make this a property, you break your code in “interesting” ways. ;-) –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 28 '12 at 10:23

There are many ways of achieving this. You can create a complex state machine performing your logic (fastest) but for many cases, that will be overkill. Alternatively, you can keep track of an boolean which holds the state of your instance just like you have now. You can also decide to combine both solutions into a simple state machine with methods like (moderatly fast):

public class TestClass
{
    private Action performLayoutAction;

    public TestClass()
    {
        // initial state
        performLayoutAction = InitializePeformLayout;
    }

    public void PerformLayout()
    {
        performLayoutAction();
    }

    private void InitializePeformLayout()
    {
        // whatever 

        performLayoutAction = ContiniousPerformLayout;
    }

    private void ContiniousPerformLayout()
    {
        // whatever 
    }
} 
share|improve this answer

You can use nullable types and the null coalescing operator to declare a Size property:

Size? _containerSize;

Size ContainerSize {
  get {
    return (_containerSize ?? (_containerSize = _InitialContainerSize)).Value;
  }
}

You can then use it like this:

void PerformLayout() { 
  var size = ContainerSize;
  // ...
}

If the type you want to lazy initialize is a reference type it becomes even simpler.

Another option is to use the Lazy<T> type. This can used in multi-threading scenarios where the above code can break:

Lazy<Size> _containerSize = new Lazy<Size>(() => _InitialContainerSize);

void PerformLayout() { 
  var size = _containerSize.Value;
  // ...
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.