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I'm using loads of colors in XNA. All those colors come from a Theme class, which contains the possible colors for the current theme.

These colors are used in SpriteBatch.Draw() as an overlay, using a white texture (1,1 px).

The user has the option to change this theme at runtime, then the colors of the Theme class get reassigned to.

However, since Color is a struct, everything I assigned it to, gets a new copy of this object.

Problem is that if I change the original colors, the changes won't be reflected. Is there any way I can pass the colors by reference? Or another solution?

Some more info:

My theme class:

/// <summary>
    /// Theme enumerator
    /// </summary>
    public enum Theme
    {
        Standard = 1, Blue, Dark
    }

    public class ThemeColor
    {

        //TODO: Refactor this out
        private readonly SmartHome _gameRef;

        public Color FBlue;
        public Color FDarkGrey;
        public Color FGreen;
        public Color FLightBlue;
        public Color FLightGrey;
        public Color FOrange;
        public Color FWhite;

        public ThemeColor(SmartHome gameref)
        {
            Dal.Instance.Setting.OnChangedSetting += ChangedColor;

            FBlue = new Color(0, 114, 186);
            FDarkGrey = new Color(107, 108, 110);
            FGreen = new Color(140, 189, 70);
            FLightBlue = new Color(0, 179, 231);
            FLightGrey = new Color(233, 233, 234);
            FOrange = new Color(241, 142, 0);
            FWhite = Color.White;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Called if a setting is changed, checks if this setting is a theme setting,
        /// if so, change the colors
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="setting">Changed setting</param>
        public void ChangedColor(Setting setting)
        {
            if (setting.Key == "Theme")
            {

                switch ((Theme)Int32.Parse(setting.Value))
                {
                    case Theme.Standard:     
                        FBlue = new Color(0, 114, 186);
                        FDarkGrey = new Color(107, 108, 110);
                        FGreen = new Color(140, 189, 70);
                        FLightBlue = new Color(0, 179, 231);
                        FLightGrey = new Color(233, 233, 234);
                        FOrange = new Color(241, 142, 0);
                        FWhite = Color.White;
                        break;
                    case Theme.Blue:
                        FBlue = new Color(0, 114, 186);
                        FDarkGrey = new Color(107, 108, 110);
                        FGreen = new Color(0, 179, 231);
                        FLightBlue = new Color(241, 142, 0);
                        FLightGrey = new Color(233, 233, 234);
                        FOrange = new Color(140, 189, 70);
                        FWhite = Color.White;
                        break;
                    case Theme.Dark:
                        FBlue = new Color(233, 233, 234);
                        FDarkGrey = new Color(0, 179, 231);
                        FGreen = new Color(107, 108, 110);
                        FLightBlue = new Color(0, 114, 186);
                        FLightGrey = new Color(140, 189, 70);
                        FOrange = new Color(241, 142, 0);
                        FWhite = Color.White;
                        break;
                }
            }
        }
    }

A control has a property Color, and is set like this: control ctrl.Color = ThemeColor.FGreen

Then in the control class: SpriteBatch.Draw(x,x,Color);

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could contain the app theme colours in a class and access the class copy of the struct each time you pass it somewhere. Of course, the struct and the colour itself will remain a value type, but the important bit is accessing the same copy of the colour so far as I can tell.

public static class ColourContainer
{
    public static Color ThemeColour { get; }

    public static void UpdateTheme(Color newColour)
    {
        // Update, etc.
    } 
}

How these are then passed into the methods likely cannot change (unless the code is yours), but the source of the colour is what is important. So long as you get it from the container each time and update the container on theme change, the change should ripple throughout the system.

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I added some code to clarify it up a bit. The code is mine. As you may see, using the static property is not really an option, since the color gets stored in each object, and is then used for drawing, or am I seeing your solution wrong? –  Mortana Mar 28 '12 at 9:49
    
@Mortana Hi, my solution was really if the other code wasn't yours. To get it to work you wouldn't store the colour on each object, but instead access the shared resource. Consequently, this is similar to what you'd do anyway if you wanted all objects to hold their own but still get shared updates... the same object instance would need to be provided. You can achieve that by using a class. –  Adam Houldsworth Mar 28 '12 at 9:54
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In your control change your Color property this way...

class Control
{
     public int UseThemeColor = -1;    

     public Color Color { 
         get { return (UseThemeColor==-1 ? _color : ThemeColor.GetByIndex(UseThemColor); } 
         set { _color = value; UseThemColor = -1; }
     }
}
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