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Is there a way to preserve the interactive navigation settings of a figure such that the next time the figure is updated the Zoom/Pan characteristics don't go back to the default values? To be more specific, if a zoom in a figure, and then I update the plot, is it possible to make the new figure appear with the same zoom settings of the previous one? I am using Tkinter.

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I found a method called get_navigate_mode() but I have no idea how I can use it –  maupertius Mar 28 '12 at 13:16
1  
How are you updating the plot? If you're doing it correctly (e.g. line.set_data), it does exactly what you want... –  Joe Kington Mar 28 '12 at 13:21
    
My plot consists of a colormap that I create with imshow(). The figure appears when I press a button. For updating I mean pressing the same button again. –  maupertius Mar 28 '12 at 13:38
    
How do you update the image, though? Are you recreating it with imshow or are you updating the plot? (i.e. im = plt.imshow() and then im.set_data(new_data)) –  Joe Kington Mar 29 '12 at 12:56
    
The button I used is the same to create the image and to update the plot. If I use im = plt.imshow() and then im.set_data(new_data) it doesn't keep my navigation panel's settings (it' like it's creating a new figure). I've tried using imshow before pressing the button but then I can't use set_data and draw() –  maupertius Mar 29 '12 at 13:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to update the image instead of making a new image each time. As an example:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib.widgets import Button

class DummyPlot(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.imsize = (10, 10)
        self.data = np.random.random(self.imsize)

        self.fig, self.ax = plt.subplots()
        self.im = self.ax.imshow(self.data)

        buttonax = self.fig.add_axes([0.45, 0.9, 0.1, 0.075])
        self.button = Button(buttonax, 'Update')
        self.button.on_clicked(self.update)

    def update(self, event):
        self.data += np.random.random(self.imsize) - 0.5
        self.im.set_data(self.data)
        self.im.set_clim([self.data.min(), self.data.max()])
        self.fig.canvas.draw()

    def show(self):
        plt.show()

p = DummyPlot()
p.show()

If you want to plot the data for the first time when you hit "update", one work-around is to plot dummy data first and make it invisible.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib.widgets import Button

class DummyPlot(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.imsize = (10, 10)
        self.data = np.random.random(self.imsize)
        self.fig, self.ax = plt.subplots()

        dummy_data = np.zeros(self.imsize)
        self.im = self.ax.imshow(dummy_data)
        self.im.set_visible(False)

        buttonax = self.fig.add_axes([0.45, 0.9, 0.1, 0.075])
        self.button = Button(buttonax, 'Update')
        self.button.on_clicked(self.update)

    def update(self, event):
        self.im.set_visible(True)
        self.data += np.random.random(self.imsize) - 0.5
        self.im.set_data(self.data)
        self.im.set_clim([self.data.min(), self.data.max()])
        self.fig.canvas.draw()

    def show(self):
        plt.show()

p = DummyPlot()
p.show()

Alternately, you could just turn auto-scaling off, and create a new image each time. This will be significantly slower, though.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib.widgets import Button

class DummyPlot(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.imsize = (10, 10)
        self.fig, self.ax = plt.subplots()

        self.ax.axis([-0.5, self.imsize[1] - 0.5, 
                      self.imsize[0] - 0.5, -0.5])
        self.ax.set_aspect(1.0)
        self.ax.autoscale(False)

        buttonax = self.fig.add_axes([0.45, 0.9, 0.1, 0.075])
        self.button = Button(buttonax, 'Update')
        self.button.on_clicked(self.update)

    def update(self, event):
        self.ax.imshow(np.random.random(self.imsize))
        self.fig.canvas.draw()

    def show(self):
        plt.show()

p = DummyPlot()
p.show()
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, it's much clearer with an example. My mistake I guess is that I want to be able to both create and update the graph with the same button. In other words, when the programme starts I don't see the graph, which appears when I press a button. The same graph is updated with new data (and sometimes new axis label) after pressing the button once again. –  maupertius Mar 29 '12 at 14:29
    
In that case, you could make an image with dummy data, or make a new image each time but turn autoscaling off. Have a look at the two new examples. Hope that helps! –  Joe Kington Mar 29 '12 at 14:51
    
Thank you, that really helps! I think I just have to change the structure of my script. In fact, the figure window is created when I press the button that later on I wanna use to update the graph. In the case you suggested me, the figure window is already created before I press the button, and that's why I wasn't able to use set_data. With your solution the plotting will be much faster but the figure window has to be already there when I press the button –  maupertius Mar 29 '12 at 15:09
    
Oh! Well, if you do want a completely new figure window each time (but zoomed to the previous region), you can keep track of the last extent (extent = ax.axis()) and then set it when you put up a new figure (ax.axis(extent)). On the other hand, like you say, it's probably better in the long run to change the structure of your code a bit. –  Joe Kington Mar 29 '12 at 15:16
    
Yeah, I'll probably change my structure a bit. Many thanks for your help! –  maupertius Mar 29 '12 at 15:34

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