Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i`m working on my assignment for univ, and since some parts are not really good explained i got some problems there is my structure and my constructor for it, it has to be dynamical but i get the fallowing error. Some help is really appreciated thank you. .h:

const int days=31;
const int exp=6;

struct Array{
int days;
int exp;
int **M;
};

.cpp:

void constr(Array &loc){
//Construct of 31*6 Matrix, were 31 nr. of days and 6 specific types:
//0-HouseKeeping, 1-Food, 2-Transport, 3-Clothing, 4-TelNet, 5-others
loc.days = days;
loc.exp = exp;
loc.M=malloc(loc.days*sizeof(int*));
for(int i=0; i<loc.days;i++ ){
    loc.M[i] = malloc(loc.exp*sizeof(int));
    for (int j = 0; j< loc.exp; j++){
        loc.M[i][j] = 0;
    }
}
}

error:

..\src\structs.cpp: In function 'void constr(Array&)':
..\src\structs.cpp:7:36: error: invalid conversion from 'void*' to 'int**'    [-fpermissive]
..\src\structs.cpp:9:40: error: invalid conversion from 'void*' to 'int*' [-fpermissive]
share|improve this question
1  
malloc returns void* so explicitly have to cast it to int* in your case. But, why not use new instead of malloc. If you are told to use malloc then fine. –  Jagannath Mar 28 '12 at 9:52
    
typecast malloc –  Jeeva Mar 28 '12 at 9:53
    
void constr is actually a free function. A proper C++ constructor would be a member of Array. –  Stephan Mar 28 '12 at 9:54
    
coudl you please explain me, how it would be with the right way for c++ –  Bogdan Maier Mar 28 '12 at 10:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since this is C++:

loc.M = new int*[loc.days];
for(int i=0; i<loc.days;i++ ){
   loc.M[i] = new int[loc.exp];
   for (int j = 0; j< loc.exp; j++){
       loc.M[i][j] = 0;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you, i will give it a try right away. –  Bogdan Maier Mar 28 '12 at 10:00
    
..\src\/structs.cpp:7:36: error: invalid conversion from 'void*' to 'int**' [-fpermissive] ..\src\/structs.cpp:9:40: error: invalid conversion from 'void*' to 'int*' [-fpermissive] still having this type of error :< –  Bogdan Maier Mar 28 '12 at 10:10
    
@BogdanMaier you're doing something wrong then, it should compile: ideone.com/X7Wjq –  Luchian Grigore Mar 28 '12 at 10:42

Please, stop using std::vector > or, worse T tab[][] for representing a 2D array. You should use a 1D array to store data, a an index array to store row pointers. That way, your data remains contiguous, and you still can have a nice syntax.

  template<typename T>


class Array2D



{
    std::vector<T>  m_data;
    std::vector<T*> m_ptr;
    size_t m_iWidth;
    size_t m_iHeight;

    void Link(void)
    {
      for (unsigned int j = 0; j < m_iHeight; ++j)
        m_ptr[j] = &m_data[j * m_iWidth];
    }


  public:
    Array2D(void)
    {
    };
    Array2D(const size_t i_width, const size_t i_height) :
      m_iWidth(i_width),
      m_iHeight(i_height),
      m_data(i_width * i_height),
      m_ptr(i_height)
    {
      Link();
    }


    void Resize(const size_t niou_width, const size_t niou_height)
    {
      if (m_iWidth == niou_width && m_iHeight == niou_height)
        return;

      m_iWidth  = niou_width;
      m_iHeight = niou_height;

      m_data.resize(niou_height * niou_width);
      m_ptr.resize(niou_height);
      Link();
    }


    typename std::vector<T>::iterator begin(void)
    {
      return m_data.begin();
    }


    typename std::vector<T>::iterator end(void)
    {
      return m_data.end();
    }


    void assign(T value)
    {
      m_data.assign(m_iWidth * m_iHeight, value);
    }


    Array2D(const Array2D& a) :
      m_iWidth(a.m_iWidth),
      m_iHeight(a.m_iHeight),
      m_data(a.m_data)
    {
      m_ptr.resize(m_iHeight);
      Link();
    }


    Array2D& operator=(const Array2D a)
    {
      swap(*this, a);
      return *this;
    }

    template <typename U>
    friend void swap(Array2D<U>& first, Array2D<U>& second)
    {
      using std::swap;
      swap(first.m_iHeight, second.m_iHeight);
      swap(first.m_iWidth, second.m_iWidth);
      swap(first.m_data, second.m_data);
      swap(first.m_ptr, second.m_ptr);
    }

    ~Array2D()
    {
    };

    T* operator[](const size_t ligne)
    {
      return m_ptr[ligne];
    };
    const T* operator[](const size_t ligne) const
    {
      return m_ptr[ligne];
    };

    T& operator()(const size_t col, const size_t lig)
    {
      return m_ptr[lig][col];
    };
    const T& operator()(const size_t col, const size_t lig) const
    {
      return m_ptr[lig][col];
    };
share|improve this answer
    
i`m not allowed to use vector :< –  Bogdan Maier Mar 28 '12 at 11:47

Since you asked for C++ constructors in your comment... See the code below. I also replaced your two-dimensional C-style array with a C++ vector. I added code comments to the relevant lines:

Array.h:

#pragma once

#include <vector>

struct Array
{
    // this is a c++ constructor declaration
    Array(int daysParam, int expParam);

    int days;
    int exp;

    // use a vector of vectors instead allocating with new or malloc
    // it is easier to initialize and the compiler will clean it up for you
    std::vector<std::vector<int> > M;
};

Array.cpp:

#include "Array.h"

// Array constructor definition with initializer list
// all data members are initialized here by invoking their constructor
Array::Array(int daysParam, int expParam)
    : days(daysParam), 
      exp(expParam), 
      M(daysParam, std::vector<int>(expParam, 0))
{
}

Example for usage of Array (Program.cpp):

#include "Array.h"

int main()
{
    // create a new Array, using the c++ constructor
    Array myArray(31, 6);

    // access elements in the 2-dimensional array
    int singleValue = myArray.M[15][3];

    return 0;
}

I strongly advise you to read a book about C++

share|improve this answer
1  
This is the real C++ way to do that. Still I wonder if he needs to learn about pointers he may need the pointer solution. –  Sambatyon Mar 28 '12 at 10:39
loc.M = (int**)malloc(loc.days*sizeof(int*));
loc.M[i] = (int*)malloc(loc.exp*sizeof(int));
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.