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I've got an implementation of the Levenshtein distance algorithm I wrote up in Python that operates on lists of words rather than strings. Here it is...the first function acts as a wrapper:

351     def getDiff( self ):
352         t1 = time.time( )
353         self.diff = 0
354         
355         conn = psycopg2.connect( ClientConfig[ "CLIENT_CONN_STRING" ] )
356         SQL  = "SELECT parsed_document FROM spider_client_document WHERE url = %s ORDER BY time_stamp DESC LIMIT 1;"  
357         cur  = conn.cursor( )
358         cur.execute( SQL, ( self.url, ) )
359         old_parsed_document, = cur.fetchone( )
360         conn.commit( )
361         cur.close( )
362         conn.close( )
363         return 0
364         if len( old_parsed_document ) == 0:
365             self.diff = 100
366             return
367         distance, aLength, bLength = self.levenshteinDistanceByWords(
368             old_parsed_document, 
369             self.parsedDocument  
370         )   
371         if aLength + bLength == 0:
372             self.diff = 0
373             return 100
374         self.diff = distance / ( aLength + bLength )
375         old = ""
376         t2 = time.time( )

And here is the algorithm itself:

161     def levenshteinDistanceByWords( self, A, B ):
162         t1 = time.time( )
163         disjoint = self.disjointStrings( A, B )
164         if not disjoint:
165             try:
166                 splitA = re.compile( '\s+' ).split( A )
167                 splitB = re.compile( '\s+' ).split( B )
168                 if A == B:
169                     return 0, len( splitA ), len( splitB )
170                 if A == "":
171                     b = len( splitB )
172                     return b, 0, b
173                 if B == "":
174                     a = len( splitA )
175                     return a, a, 0
176                 s = splitA
177                 t = splitB
178                 m = len( s )
179                 n = len( t )
180                 s.insert( 0, 0 )
181                 t.insert( 0, 0 )
182                 d = [ ]
183                 for i in range( 0, m + 1 ):
184                     d.append( [ ] )
185                     for j in range( 0, n + 1 ):
186                         d[ i ].append( 0 )
187                 for i in range( 0, m ):
188                     d[ i ][ 0 ] = i
189                 for j in range( 0, n ):
190                     d[ 0 ][ j ] = j
191                 for j in range( 1, n + 1 ):
192                     for i in range( 1, m + 1 ):
193                         if s[ i ] == t[ j ]:
194                             d[ i ][ j ] = d[ i - 1 ][ j - 1 ]
195                         else:
196                             d[ i ][ j ] = min(
197                             d[ i - 1 ][ j ] + 1,
198                             d[ i ][ j - 1 ] + 1,
199                             d[ i - 1 ][ j - 1 ] + 1
200                             )
201                 t2 = time.time( )
202                 diff = int( d[ m ][ n ] )
203                 return diff, m, n
204             except:
205                 return -1, m, n
206         else:
207             return disjoint

I've confirmed the function disjointStrings( ) is fine.

My problem: This function leaks memory! I'm running it in a web spider to get the diff from one download to the next. When I leave the return 0 in getDiff( ) where you see it on line 363 it works fine. When I comment it out it leaks quite prolificly.

Does anyone have a clue why the garbage collector might be missing this? Am I overlooking something? Is it a design problem? The function runs in every thread of a multi-threaded client application using python-threading.

Any help would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
What happens in disjointStrings? –  Daniel Roseman Mar 28 '12 at 10:48
    
The problem is definitely not in disjointStrings. It checks to see that the strings are not disjoint by checking if either contains words in the other. If they are disjoint it returns a tuple of the ( length of the longer sentence, length of sentence A, length of sentence B ) –  akellehe Mar 28 '12 at 11:06
    
Clean up your code by examining exception types, using self.ParsedDocument instead of passing it as an external argument to methods, etc. Maybe the problem will be easier to spot, and maybe it will just disappear. –  alexis Mar 28 '12 at 14:54
    
Sounds like a plan. I'll get back to you this evening. Thanks! –  akellehe Mar 28 '12 at 14:56
    
Hey man, I think you might be on to something.... I found this: effbot.org/pyfaq/how-does-python-manage-memory.htm –  akellehe Mar 28 '12 at 16:17

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