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Is it possible to convert and Object[]array to and integer Array.

The reason I am asking is because I added integers to an ArrayList and then converted this into and Object[]array.

ArrayList<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();
Object[] arrayNumbers = list.toArray();

Which would be the best way of getting this into and int[]array? All I need to do is to sort these numbers. Can I sort all my numbers in this arraylist without converting it into an int[]array?

Kind regards

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"It depends how the sort is being done". (No, it is not required to have an int[] to sort a collection of integer objects; at the very least Integer implements Comparable.) –  user166390 Mar 28 '12 at 10:14
    
sorting is a different thing than converting a List<Integer> into a int[] array. And the latter was already answered: stackoverflow.com/questions/3706470/… –  Alonso Dominguez Mar 28 '12 at 10:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should be doing this:

Integer[] arrayNumbers = list.toArray(new Integer[list.size()]);

If you just want to sort, simply use Collections.sort(list).

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You can sort the list using Collections.sort method instead of all the conversions.

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You could use the following code to sort your values

 Arrays.sort(arrayNumbers);
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You can sort the ArrayList using Collections.sort()

Collections.sort(list);
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You already have the list of integers in the variable list.

Iterate over list and keep a track of the index and add array[index] = i:

Algorithm not Java code, I'll leave that to you:

int index;

for (index =0; index <= list.Count(); index++) {
  array[index] = list[index];
}
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This won't even compile! –  adarshr Apr 14 '12 at 11:40
    
@adarshr did you event read my answer? I clearly state it's the algorithm not Java code.....why downvote? –  Darren Davies Apr 14 '12 at 11:53
    
Sorry, didn't notice. Reverted back. –  adarshr Apr 14 '12 at 12:37

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