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I am looping through a list of samaccountnames and performing several actions:

# Disabling user
try {    
    Disable-QADUser $user | Out-Null
} catch [exception] {
    "Disable-QADuser: " + $($_.Exception.Message) | out-file $logfile -append
    write-host " - Error disabling useraccount." -fore yellow
}

# Set informative description
try {    
    Set-QADuser $user -Description "Disabled $now"  | Out-Null
} catch [exception] {
    "Set-QADuser: " + $($_.Exception.Message)| out-file $logfile -append
    write-host " - Error setting informative description in AD." -fore yellow
} 

But how do I output something if the command completed successfully? Something like

write-host "User $user disabled"
"User $user disabled" | out-file $logfile -append

All help/pointers are greatly appreciated!

EDIT I noticed that I can use tee-object to send the output to file as well as console.. This way I do not have to have to lines to "tee" the output:)

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2  
Well you could simply set a variable to true directly after all the statements in the try clause. An exception would skip that hence it would not be set (or remain false if you set it before the try when you exit the try and catch clauses. Then test for its value and perform some action accordingly. –  deed02392 Mar 28 '12 at 10:21
    
Great tip, but not what I am after:) I vote your response up since I am sure I will have use for it later! –  Sune Mar 28 '12 at 10:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Probably showing my ignorance here (I know nothing about power-shell, sorry - don't down vote me!). But if it's anything like java, you'd just place it underneath the line you are trying to execute:

try {    
    Set-QADuser $user -Description "Disabled $now"  | Out-Null
    write-host "User $user disabled"
    "User $user disabled" | out-file $logfile -append
} catch [exception] {
    "Set-QADuser: " + $($_.Exception.Message)| out-file $logfile -append
    write-host " - Error setting informative description in AD." -fore yellow
} 
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 That's how I would do it. I don't know power-shell (yet) either :) –  surfen Mar 28 '12 at 10:37
    
Ahh, so the TRY jumps to CATCH if an exception occurs?! Of course! Works great:) –  Sune Mar 28 '12 at 10:53
    
It does, it's a behaviour in most (all?) languages that implement try-catch clauses. –  deed02392 Mar 29 '12 at 17:15
    
I didn't know it either that try jumps to catch if an exception occurs! Great tip! Thank you! –  KrLx_roller Apr 10 '12 at 10:30

One important thing to keep in mind: if for some reason disabling the user didn't work, your catch block WILL NOT invoke since the error is not a terminating error. To change the type of the error to terminating error, use the ErrorAction parameter:

Set-QADuser $user -Description "Disabled $now" -ErrorAction Stop | ...
share|improve this answer
    
Good point! Thank you! –  Sune Mar 28 '12 at 12:42
    
If you want to invoke something after a try-catch clause, you would use the finally operator. –  deed02392 Mar 29 '12 at 17:16

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