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I want to make a common function which takes a control as an argument (like UITextField, UIButton etc.)

Its working fine if I do like this

- (void)  myFunction : (UITextField*) : control
{

}

//But I want to make it common for any control

- (void)  myFunction : (`I don't know what to write here`) : control
{
     //suppose if control is UITextField, I can set its font and its size.
     //something like this
    [control setFont:[UIFont fontWithName:@"Verdana" size:12]];
}

Is this possible?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can also go like this

- (void)  myFunction : (id) control
{
  if([control isKindOfClass:[UITextField class]]){
     // Your textfield condition
  }
}
share|improve this answer

use generic ID then cast your control and ask if it's a UITextField (or subclass of...)

   - (void)  myFunction : (id)  control
    {
         //suppose if control is UITextField, I can set its font and its size.
         //something like this
        (UITextField*)aText = (UITextField*)control;
        if ([aText.class isSubclassOfClass:[UITextField class]]) {
            [aText setFont:[UIFont fontWithName:@"Verdana" size:12]];
        }
    }
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Yes, It is possible. You can pass UIView as an argument like Below

- (void)  myFunction:(UIView*)customView{
   if([customView isKindOfClass:[UIImageView class]]){
     // This is UIImageview
  }
}

Hope this Help.

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You should pass UIControl, since it's the super class for the controls.

Then in your code, you should use methods like respondsToSelector: to determine whether or not the control passed in can do what you need it to do.

You could check its class type using isKindOfClass: or isMemberOfClass as well.

Once you know which object you're dealing with, you could type cast it to save on some typing and remove any warnings about not responding to selectors, like this:

// decided that it's a UITextField after using `respondsToSelector:` or `isKindOfClass:`
UITextField *aTextField = (UITextField *)control;

This method is known as "duck-typing" - since it's similar to saying "If it walks like a duck and sounds like a duck, it'll probably be a duck".

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UIControl is the superclass of UITextField, UIButton, and other controls, so this is what you want:

- (void) myFunction:(UIControl *) control
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