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I'm a newcomer to Python but I understand that things should not be done this way, so please consider the following code snippets as purely educational :-)

I'm currently reading 'Learning Python' and trying to fully understand the following example:

>>> L = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> for x in L:
...    x += 1
...
>>> L
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

I did not understand if this behavior was somewhat related to the immutability of the numeric types, so I've run the following test:

>>> L = [[1], [2], [3], [4], [5]]
>>> for x in L:
...    x += ['_']
...
>>> L
[[1, '_'], [2, '_'], [3, '_'], [4, '_'], [5, '_']]

Question: what makes the list unchanged in the first code and changed in the second ?

My intuition is that the syntax is misleading and that:

  • x += 1 for an integer really means x = x + 1 (thus assigning a new reference)
  • x += ['_'] for a list really means x.extend('_') (thus changing the list in place)
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7  
your intuition is correct –  Karoly Horvath Mar 28 '12 at 12:12
3  
and for completeness, the "correct" way to do this is [x+1 for x in L] –  Kimvais Mar 28 '12 at 12:17
    
@Kimvais: that assumes you want to create a new list. –  MattH Mar 28 '12 at 12:26
1  
L = [x+1 for x in L] if you don't want a new list, then :) –  Kimvais Mar 28 '12 at 12:28
1  
@Kimvais: That still creates a new list, it's just setting L to refer to the new list. –  MattH Mar 28 '12 at 12:45
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Question: what makes the list unchanged in the first code and changed in the second ?

In the first code, the list is a sequence of (immutable) integers. The loop sets x to refer to each element of the sequence in turn. x += 1 changes x to refer to a different integer that is one more than the value x previously referred to. The element in the original list is unchanged.

In the second code, the list if a sequence of (mutable) lists. The loop sets x to refer to each element of the sequence in turn. x += ['_'] as x refers to a list, this extends the list referred to by x with ['_'].

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So it's really the immutability of the integer that explains it than, thanks ! –  icecrime Mar 28 '12 at 12:55
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