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On a Debian-based OS (Ubuntu, Debian Squeeze), I'm using Python (2.7, 3.2) fcntl to lock a file. As I understand from what I read, fnctl.flock locks a file in a way, that an exception will be thrown if another client wants to lock the same file.

I built a little example, which I would expect to throw an excepiton, since I first lock the file, and then, immediately after, I try to lock it again:

#!/usr/bin/env python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
import fcntl
fcntl.flock(open('/tmp/locktest', 'r'), fcntl.LOCK_EX)
try:
    fcntl.flock(open('/tmp/locktest', 'r'), fcntl.LOCK_EX | fcntl.LOCK_NB)
except IOError:
    print("can't immediately write-lock the file ($!), blocking ...")
else:
    print("No error")

But the example just prints "No error".

If I split this code up to two clients running at the same time (one locking and then waiting, the other trying to lock after the first lock is already active), I get the same behavior - no effect at all.

Whats the explanation for this behavior?

EDIT:

Changes as requested by nightcracker, this version also prints "No error", although I would not expect that:

#!/usr/bin/env python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
import fcntl
import time
fcntl.flock(open('/tmp/locktest', 'w'), fcntl.LOCK_EX | fcntl.LOCK_NB)
try:
    fcntl.flock(open('/tmp/locktest', 'w'), fcntl.LOCK_EX | fcntl.LOCK_NB)
except IOError:
    print("can't immediately write-lock the file ($!), blocking ...")
else:
    print("No error")
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There is a catch regarding file locks within the same process. So within a single process, threads will share the file lock. –  bouke Jan 28 '13 at 14:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Got it. The error in my script is that I create a new file descriptor on each call:

fcntl.flock(open('/tmp/locktest', 'r'), fcntl.LOCK_EX | fcntl.LOCK_NB)
(...)
fcntl.flock(open('/tmp/locktest', 'r'), fcntl.LOCK_EX | fcntl.LOCK_NB)

Instead, I have to assign the file object to a variable and than try to lock:

f = open('/tmp/locktest', 'r')
fcntl.flock(f, fcntl.LOCK_EX | fcntl.LOCK_NB)
(...)
fcntl.flock(f, fcntl.LOCK_EX | fcntl.LOCK_NB)

Than I'm also getting the exception I wanted to see: IOError: [Errno 11] Resource temporarily unavailable. Now I have to think about in which cases it makes sense at all to use fcntl.

share|improve this answer
    
I get "No error" :(. Do you know why? –  Etam Jun 13 '12 at 16:29
4  
To be clear, the error isn't that you're creating a new file descriptor on each call, but that the previous file descriptor has been garbage collected (and the previous lock goes with it). If you were to save both of those file descriptors to different variables, the script would work. –  Dustin Boswell Aug 29 '13 at 0:18

I hade the same problem... I've solved it holding the opened file in a separate variable:

Won't work:

fcntl.lockf(open('/tmp/locktest', 'w'), fcntl.LOCK_EX | fcntl.LOCK_NB)

Works:

lockfile = open('/tmp/locktest', 'w')
fcntl.lockf(lockfile, fcntl.LOCK_EX | fcntl.LOCK_NB)

I think that the first doesnt' works because the opened file is garbage collected, closed and the lock released.

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Old post, but if anyone else finds it, I get this behaviour:

>>> fcntl.flock(open('test.flock', 'w'), fcntl.LOCK_EX)
>>> fcntl.flock(open('test.flock', 'w'), fcntl.LOCK_EX | fcntl.LOCK_NB)
# That didn't throw an exception

>>> f = open('test.flock', 'w')
>>> fcntl.flock(f, fcntl.LOCK_EX)
>>> fcntl.flock(open('test.flock', 'w'), fcntl.LOCK_EX | fcntl.LOCK_NB)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
IOError: [Errno 35] Resource temporarily unavailable
>>> f.close()
>>> fcntl.flock(open('test.flock', 'w'), fcntl.LOCK_EX | fcntl.LOCK_NB)
# No exception

It looks like in the first case, the file is closed after the first line, presumably because the file object is inaccessible. Closing the file releases the lock.

share|improve this answer

There are two catches. According to the documentation:

  1. When operation is LOCK_SH or LOCK_EX, it can also be bitwise ORed with LOCK_NB to avoid blocking on lock acquisition. If LOCK_NB is used and the lock cannot be acquired, an IOError will be raised and the exception will have an errno attribute set to EACCES or EAGAIN (depending on the operating system; for portability, check for both values).

    You forgot to set LOCK_NB.

  2. On at least some systems, LOCK_EX can only be used if the file descriptor refers to a file opened for writing.

    You have a file opened for reading, which might not support LOCK_EX on your system.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. But both changes (adding fcntl.LOCK_NB to the first lock AND open the file for writing) don't change the behavior, still getting "No error". –  ifischer Mar 28 '12 at 12:53
    
@ifischer: does fcntl work from C on your system? What version of Python do you use? –  nightcracker Mar 28 '12 at 13:03
    
Tried both Python 2.7.1 and Python 3.2. Will try C later –  ifischer Mar 28 '12 at 13:11

You need to pass in the file descriptor (obtainable by calling the fileno() method of the file object). The code below throws an IOError when the same code is run in a separate interpreter.

>>> import fcntl
>>> thefile = open('/tmp/testfile')
>>> fd = thefile.fileno()
>>> fcntl.flock(fd, fcntl.LOCK_EX | fcntl.LOCK_NB)
share|improve this answer
    
This shouldn't be necessary. From the documentation: Perform the lock operation op on file descriptor fd (file objects providing a fileno() method are accepted as well). –  nightcracker Mar 28 '12 at 12:54
    
applying this does not change the behavior, still getting "No error", in opposite to what I would expect –  ifischer Mar 28 '12 at 12:55
    
@ifischer: Odd, I pasted the code above into two python interpreters on an Ubuntu machine and the first one completed, the second threw an exception. –  Vatine Mar 28 '12 at 13:30

Try:

global f
f = open('/tmp/locktest', 'r')

When the file is closed the lock will vanish.

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